Pulitzer Prize for Fiction

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This prize is given in the United States. There are several other Pulitzer Prizes. The Pulitzer Prize for Fiction is for writing by an American author. Usually this writing is about American life. It started as the Pulitzer Prize for the Novel, which was awarded between 1918 and 1947.[1]

1910s[change | edit source]

1920s[change | edit source]

1930s[change | edit source]

1940s[change | edit source]

1950s[change | edit source]

1960s[change | edit source]

1970s[change | edit source]

1980s[change | edit source]

Entries from this point on include the finalists listed after the winner for each year.

1990s[change | edit source]

2000s[change | edit source]

2010s[change | edit source]

References[change | edit source]

  1. "Pulitzer Prize for the Novel" (web). http://www.pulitzer.org/bycat/Novel. Retrieved 2008-08-19.
  2. The fiction jury had recommended the 1941 award go to Ernest Hemingway's For Whom the Bell Tolls. Although the Pulitzer Board agreed at first, the president of Columbia University, Nicholas Murray Butler, persuaded the board to change its decision because he thought the novel was offensive, and no award was given that year. McDowell, Edwin. "Publishing: Pulitzer Controversies." New York Times 11 May 1984: C26.
  3. The fiction jury had recommended the 1957 award to Elizabeth Spencer's The Voice at the Back Door, but the Pulitzer board, which has sole discretion for awarding the prize, made no award. Source: McDowell, Edwin. "Publishing: Pulitzer Controversies". The New York Times, 11 May 1984: C26.
  4. The three novels the Pulitzer committee put forth for consideration to the Pulitzer board were: Losing Battles by Eudora Welty; Mr. Sammler's Planet by Saul Bellow; and The Wheel of Love by Joyce Carol Oates. The board rejected all three and opted for no award. Source: Fischer, Heinz-Dietrich. The Pulizer Prize Archive, Volume 10, "Novel/Fiction Awards 1917-1994". Munich: K.G. Saur, 1994. LX-LXI.
  5. The fiction jury had unanimously recommended the 1974 award to Thomas Pynchon's Gravity's Rainbow, but the Pulitzer board, which has sole discretion for awarding the prize, made no award. Source: McDowell, Edwin. "Publishing: Pulitzer Controversies". The New York Times, 11 May 1984: C26.
  6. The fiction jury had recommended the 1977 award to Norman MacLean's A River Runs Through It, but the Pulitzer board, which has sole discretion for awarding the prize, made no award. Source: McDowell, Edwin. "Publishing: Pulitzer Controversies". The New York Times, 11 May 1984: C26.

Other websites[change | edit source]