Columbia University

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Columbia University

View of Columbia
Motto In lumine tuo videbimus lumen
Established 1754
Type Private
Endowment $7.2 billion
President Lee Bollinger
Students 24,820
Undergraduates 6,923
Postgraduates 15,731
Location New York City, New York, United States
Campus Urban
Athletics NCAA Division I FCS
Nickname Lions
Mascot Roaree the Lion
Website www.columbia.edu

Columbia University in the City of New York (commonly called Columbia University) is a research university in the United States. It is mainly in the Morningside Heights neighborhood of the Borough of Manhattan, in New York City. It is one of the eight Ivy League universities.

The university was created as King's College by the Church of England. It got a royal charter in 1754 from King George II of Great Britain. It was the first college in New York, and the fifth college in the Thirteen Colonies. After the American Revolution it was renamed "Columbia College" and run by the state from 1784-1787. In 1787, the college was placed under a private board of trustees. The college was located on Madison Avenue at 51st Street from 1857 to 1896 when it was renamed "Columbia University" and moved to the much larger Morningside Heights campus at 105th Street. A board of trustees runs the university to this day.

Columbia is home to the Pulitzer Prize. For over a century, the Pulitzer has been given to people for very good work in journalism, literature and music. Columbia is where FM radio was created. The school is where the foundation of modern genetics was discovered. Its Morningside Heights campus was the first North American site where the uranium atom was split.

Other websites[change | edit source]