Uluru

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Coordinates: 25°20′42″S 131°02′10″E / 25.345°S 131.03611°E / -25.345; 131.03611
Uluru
Ayers Rock
Mountain
Uluru sunset1141.jpg
Uluru at sunset
Country Australia
State Northern Territory
Elevation 863 m (2,831 ft)
Prominence 346 m (1,135 ft)
Coordinates 25°20′42″S 131°02′10″E / 25.345°S 131.03611°E / -25.345; 131.03611
Geology arkose
Orogeny Petermann
UNESCO World Heritage Site
Name Uluru - Kata Tjuṯa National Park
Year 1987 (#11)
Number 447
Criteria v,vi,vii,ix
Location in Australia
Location in Australia
Locator Red.svg
Location in Australia
Wikimedia Commons: Uluru
Website: www.environment.gov.au/…

Uluru, also called Ayers Rock, is a name given to a huge rock near Alice Springs in the Australian Outback. This is a holy place for Australian aborigines. It is in the Western Desert, in the middle of Australia. It was listed as a World Heritage site in 1987 because of its geology.[1] In 1997 it was again listed as a World Heritage site, this time because of its importance to the Anangu people.[1] It was the second place in the world to be listed as culturally significant, and it is one of the few places in the world to have two listings.[1]

Where to find Uluru

History[change | edit source]

The Anangu people believe that Uluru, and the rest of Central Australia, was formed by ancestral beings at the beginning of time. The Anangu are directly descended from these ancestors.[2]

Modern science shows that they have lived around Uluru for more than 40,000 years. They continued to live their traditional life until the 1930s.[2] This was a nomadic life, moving around to hunt and gather food according to the seasons. They have a complex ceremonial life based around Uluru.[2] They are one of the oldest human societies on earth.[3]

The first Europens to see Uluru were explorers led by William Christie Gosse.[4] He saw Uluru on 19 July 1873 and named it Ayers Rock after Sir Henry Ayers, who was Chief Secretary of South Australia.[4] The land was too dry and remote for farming, and very few people came to Uluru until the mid 20th century.[4]

References[change | edit source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 "World Heritage and International Significance". Uluru and Kata Tjuta National Park. Department of Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts. October 2009. http://www.environment.gov.au/parks/uluru/culture-history/heritage/index.html. Retrieved 2009-11-06.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 "The history of Uluru and Kata Tjuta". Uluru and Kata Tjuta National Park. Department of Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts. October 2009. http://www.environment.gov.au/parks/uluru/culture-history/history/index.html. Retrieved 2009-11-06.
  3. "Culture, History and World Heritage". Uluru and Kata Tjuta National Park. Department of Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts. October 2009. http://www.environment.gov.au/parks/uluru/culture-history/index.html. Retrieved 2009-11-06.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 "Early European history". Uluru and Kata Tjuta National Park. Department of Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts. October 2009. http://www.environment.gov.au/parks/uluru/culture-history/history/early-european-history.html. Retrieved 2009-11-06.
This article is about a World Heritage Site