United States presidential election, 2008

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2004 United States 2012
United States presidential election, 2008
November 4, 2008
Barack Obama.jpg John McCain official photo portrait-cropped-background edit.JPG
Nominee Barack Obama John McCain
Party Democrat Republican
Home state Illinois Arizona
Running mate Joe Biden Sarah Palin
Electoral vote 365 173
States won 28 + DC + NE-02 22
Popular vote 69,498,516[1] 59,948,323[1]
Percentage 52.9%[1] 45.7%[1]
United States presidential election, 2008

Electoral college votes for 2008. The winning candidate needs 270 electoral votes out of a total of 538, which is just over 50%.

Incumbent President
George W. Bush
Republican
President-Elect
Barack Obama
Democrat

The United States presidential election, 2008 is a political event which took place on November 4, 2008. During that day the President of the United States and Vice President of the United States were selected. Barack Obama from the Democratic Party defeated John McCain to win the presidency, and is the first African-American president. He was sworn in as President on January 20, 2009. In a United States presidential election a person must get 270 electoral votes to win.

Democratic Primaries[change | change source]

The candidates running for the nomination of the Democratic Party were Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton, John Edwards, Joe Biden, Dennis Kucinich, Mike Gravel, Chris Dodd, and Bill Richardson.

The main contest during the Democratic primaries was between Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton which was a very close race. Clinton won the popular vote, but ultimately Obama won more unpledged delegates and therefore the nomination.

All candidates except Mike Gravel, who switched to the Libertarian Party during the election, supported Barack Obama.

Barack Obama chose Joe Biden as the vice-presidential candidate on August 23, 2008.

Barack Obama defeated John McCain and became president of the U.S. on January 20, 2009.

Republican Primaries[change | change source]

The candidates running for the nomination of the Republican Party were John McCain, Mitt Romney, Mike Huckabee, Ron Paul, Rudy Giuliani, Fred Thompson, Tom Tancredo, Alan Keyes, Jim Gilmore, Sam Brownback, and Duncan Hunter.

Republican President George W. Bush was unable to run for re-election since a president is only able to be elected twice and vice president Dick Cheney chose not to run.

Most of the candidates withdrew early. In result, John McCain, Mike Huckabee, and Mitt Romney emerged as the three people most likely to win the nomination and Ron Paul became popular among libertarians.

John McCain was nominated by the Republican Party (by a decisive victory).

He chose Sarah Palin as the vice-presidential candidate.

John McCain lost the election to Barack Obama.

The Campaign[change | change source]

The biggest issue during the campaign was the bad economy. Other issues included health care, the Iraq War, the war on terrorism, and energy independence.

The president during the election, George W. Bush (who eventually supported John McCain), was very unpopular due to the 2007-09 "great recession", and because of that, the Obama campaign compared McCain to Bush several times.

There were four television debates during the campaign: three of them were between the two presidential candidates, and one of them was between the two vice-presidential candidates.

Results[change | change source]

Candidate Votes % States led National ECV
Barack Obama (Democrat) Yes check.svg 69,498,516 52.9% 28+DC+NE-02 365
John McCain (Republican) 59,948,323 45.7% 22 173
Ralph Nader (Independent) 739,034 0.56% 0 0
Bob Barr (Libertarian) 523,715 0.40% 0 0
Chuck Baldwin (Constitution) 199,750 0.15% 0 0
Cynthia McKinney (Green) 161,797 0.12% 0 0
Other 242,685 0.18% 0 0
Total 131,313,820 100.00% 50 + DC 538

Results by state[change | change source]

State Obama Popular Vote Obama % McCain Popular Vote McCain % Electoral Vote
Alabama 811,510 39% 1,263,741 61% 9
Alaska 80,340 36% 136,348 62% 3
Arizona 851,589 45% 1,012,878 54% 10
Arkansas 418,049 39% 632,672 59% 6
California 55
Colorado 9
Connecticut 7
Delaware 247,386 61% 151,667 38% 3
District of Columbia 210,403 93% 14,821 7% 3
Florida 4,103,638 51% 3,908,736 49% 27
Georgia 1,811,198 46% 2,022,409 53% 15
Hawaii 298,621 72% 110,848 27% 4
Idaho 235,219 36% 400,989 62% 4
Illinois 3,265,509 62% 1,970,622 37% 21
Indiana 1,367,264 50% 1,341,101 49% 11
Iowa 818,240 54% 677,508 45% 7
Kansas 499,979 41% 685,541 57% 6
Kentucky 751,515 41% 1,050,599 58% 8
Louisiana 780,981 40% 1,147,603 59% 9
Maine 4
Maryland 1,409,150 61% 873,320 38% 10
Massachusetts 1,891,083 62% 1,104,284 36% 12
Michigan 2,867,680 57% 2,044,405 41% 17
Minnesota 1,573,246 54% 1,275,466 44% 10
Mississippi 517,899 43% 684,475 57% 6
Missouri 1,436,745 49% 1,442,613 50% 11
Montana 220,401 47% 236,513 50% 3
Nebraska 315,913 41% 439,421 47% 5
Nevada 531,884 55% 411,988 43% 5
New Hampshire 4
New Jersey 2,073,934 57% 1,540,907 42% 15
New Mexico 454,291 57% 334,298 42% 5
New York 4,357,360 62% 2,573,368 37% 31
North Carolina 2,123,334 50% 2,109,281 49% 15
North Dakota 141,113 45% 168,523 53% 3
Ohio 20
Oklahoma 502,286 34% 959,645 66% 7
Oregon 7
Pennsylvania 3,184,807 55% 2,584,119 44% 21
Rhode Island 272,572 63% 150,891 35% 4
South Carolina 842,441 45% 1,008,727 54% 8
South Dakota 170,877 45% 203,002 53% 3
Tennessee 1,093,213 42% 1,487,564 57% 11
Texas 3,521,164 44% 4,467,748 55% 34
Utah 301,771 34% 555,497 63% 5
Vermont 3
Virginia 1,792,502 52% 1,637,338 47% 13
Washington 11
West Virginia 301,438 43% 394,278 56% 5
Wisconsin 1,670,474 56% 1,258,181 43% 10
Wyoming 80,496 33% 160,639 66% 3

References[change | change source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 "FEDERAL ELECTIONS 2008: Election Results for the U.S. President, the U.S. Senate and the U.S. House of Representatives". Federal Election Commission. July 2009. http://www.fec.gov/pubrec/fe2008/federalelections2008.pdf. Retrieved March 10, 2013.

Other websites[change | change source]