Walter Cronkite

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Walter Cronkite in 1985

Walter Leland Cronkite, Jr. (November 4, 1916 - July 17, 2009) was an American news reporter. He was the anchor of CBS News from 1962 to 1981.

Important events he reported included when President John F. Kennedy was shot dead; the Apollo 11 moon landing; the Vietnam War; and the Watergate scandal, which led to President Richard Nixon resigning from his position. Due to how much he knew and his honesty, he was often called "the most trusted man in America."

Cronkite was born on November 4, 1916 in St. Joseph, Missouri. He studied at the University of Texas at Austin.

He was also known for his extensive coverage of the U.S. space program, from Project Mercury to the Moon landings to the Space Shuttle. He was the only non-NASA recipient of a Moon-rock award. Cronkite is well known for his departing catchphrase "And that's the way it is," followed by the date on which the appearance aired.

Cronkite made history when he became the first television reporter to televise the assassination of John F. Kennedy.[1][2]

He was married to Mary Elizabeth "Betsy" Maxwell from 1940 until her death in 2005. They had three children.

Cronkite died on the morning of July 17, 2009 in New York City, New York from Cerebrovascular disease, aged 92.[3]

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