Worcestershire sauce

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1900 advertisement

Worcestershire sauce (spoken likeˈwʊstəˌʃɪə[1] or WOOS-ter-sheer) is a much used fermented sauce. It was first made at 68 Broad Street, Worcester, by the company Lea & Perrins in the 1830s. It was made for selling to people in 1837, and is still the only Worcestershire sauce still to be made in the UK. In 1930 the company was sold to HP Foods and was later sold to the H.J. Heinz Company from Groupe Danone in 2005.

The sauce is made ready to sell in the Midlands Road factory in Worcester, which is the home of Lea & Perrins since 16 October 1897.[2]

The H. J. Heinz Company, which now makes "The Original Lea & Perrins Worcestershire Sauce", with the name Lea & Perrins, Inc., lists these ingredients on the bottle made in the United States: vinegar, molasses, high fructose corn syrup, anchovies, water, onions, salt, garlic, tamarind concentrate, cloves, natural flavorings and chili pepper extract.

The ingredients of a bottle of Worcestershire sauce from England sold under the name "The Original & Genuine Lea & Perrins Worcestershire Sauce" by Lea & Perrins, Limited, lists the following ingredients: malt vinegar (from barley), spirit vinegar, molasses, sugar, salt, anchovies, tamarind extract, onions, garlic, spice and flavouring.

The sauce is used to make many dishes, both cooked and uncooked, and often with beef; drinks such as the Bloody Mary also use it. Lea & Perrins also makes it in concentrated form that is made ready to sell in other countries.

Worcestershire sauce is called Worcester sauce in South Africa and some parts of the US as; (pronounced /ˈwʊstə/), or spoken like Woo-ster sauce.[source?]

The "Worcestershire sauce" is one of many food products that were made because of Britain ruling India.

References[change | change source]

  1. OED
  2. The Secret Sauce, Brian Keogh, 1997