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Óscar García

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Óscar García
Óscar as manager of Red Bull Salzburg in 2017
Personal information
Full name Óscar García Junyent[1]
Date of birth (1973-04-26) 26 April 1973 (age 51)[1]
Place of birth Sabadell, Spain[1]
Height 1.82 m (6 ft 0 in)[1]
Position(s) Attacking midfielder
Club information
Current team
Reims (manager)
Youth career
1980–1984 Mercantil
1984–1991 Barcelona
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1991–1994 Barcelona B 79 (24)
1993–1999 Barcelona 69 (21)
1994–1995Albacete (loan) 29 (2)
1999–2000 Valencia 20 (4)
2000–2004 Espanyol 51 (4)
2004–2005 Lleida 23 (3)
Total 271 (58)
National team
1989 Spain U16 1 (1)
1991 Spain U18 4 (1)
1991 Spain U19 1 (0)
1991 Spain U20 3 (0)
1992–1996 Spain U21 24 (12)
1996 Spain U23 4 (2)
Teams managed
2009–2010 Catalonia (assistant)
2010–2012 Barcelona (youth)
2012–2013 Maccabi Tel Aviv
2013–2014 Brighton & Hove Albion
2014 Maccabi Tel Aviv
2014 Watford
2015–2017 Red Bull Salzburg
2017 Saint-Étienne
2018 Olympiacos
2019–2020 Celta
2021– Reims
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only

Óscar García Junyent (born 26 April 1973), player name Óscar, is a former Spanish professional footballer. He is now the manager of the Ligue 1 club Stade de Reims.

Career[change | change source]

He was able to play as an attacking midfielder or a second striker. Most of his active career he spent with CF Barcelona, but played also for Espanyol (four years), Albacete, Lleida and Valencia (one apiece). In La Liga he played 169 matches and 31 goals over 12 seasons.

International[change | change source]

He played for Spain national under-23 football team at the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta. He scored twice for the quarter-finalists.[2][3]

Coaching career[change | change source]

Maccabi Tel Aviv and England[change | change source]

In 2009 he became member of Johan Cruyff's coaching staff in the Catalonia national team.[4] On 22 May 2012 he became head coach of Maccabi Tel Aviv FC.[5]2013 Maccabi won the Israel championship.[6] Garcia resigned from his post because of personal reasons.[7]

2013 he became head coach of the Football League Championship team Brighton & Hove Albion.[8] He was November's Manager of the Month, with three wins and a draw.[9] On 12 May 2014 the team was defeatet in the play-offs by Derby County. His offer of resignation was accepted by the club.[10]

2014 García returned to Maccabi but left on 26 August due to war.[11] Then he was appointed head coach at Watford.[12] He was brought to hospital with minor chest pains on 15 September. Two weeks later he resigned as head coach.[13]

Red Bull Salzburg[change | change source]

García and Sturm Graz manager Franco Foda in May 2016

On 28 December 2015 Oscar followed Peter Zeidler as head coach of the Austrian Bundesliga team FC Red Bull Salzburg.[14] During his time in Salzburg he won twice the double (Cup and Champion).

Saint-Étienne[change | change source]

On 15 June 2017 he signed with AS Saint-Étienne. [15] In November after a 5–0 home loss against Olympique Lyonnais he left the club by mutual agreement.[16]

Olympiacos[change | change source]

2018 he became head coach of Olympiacos F.C. in Greece.[17] His contract was dissolved on 3 April 2019.[18]

Celta[change | change source]

In November 2019 he took over RC Celta de Vigo in La Liga.[19] On the last day of the season he could held the team in the first league.[20] On 9 November 2020, after only one win in nine matches of the new campaign, García was sacked.[21]

Reims[change | change source]

García returned to the French Ligue 1 in June 2021 as head coach of Stade de Reims.[22]

Personal life[change | change source]

García's brothers, Roger and Genís were also footballers. [23]

Managerial statistics[change | change source]

As of match played 6 February 2022[24]
Team Nat From To Record
P W D L Win %
Maccabi Tel Aviv Israel 22 May 2012 22 May 2013 43 28 7 8 065.12
Brighton & Hove Albion England 26 June 2013 12 May 2014 53 21 16 16 039.62
Maccabi Tel Aviv Israel 2 June 2014 26 August 2014 7 3 2 2 042.86
Watford England 2 September 2014 29 September 2014 4 1 2 1 025.00
Red Bull Salzburg Austria 28 December 2015 15 June 2017 73 51 12 10 069.86
Saint-Étienne France 15 June 2017 15 November 2017 13 5 4 4 038.46
Olympiacos Greece 6 January 2018 3 April 2018 13 6 5 2 046.15
Celta Spain 9 November 2019 9 November 2020 38 8 17 13 021.05
Reims France 23 June 2021 Present 26 8 10 8 030.77
Total 270 131 75 64 048.52

Honours[change | change source]

García celebrating Salzburg's Bundesliga win in May 2016

Player[change | change source]

Club[change | change source]

Barcelona

Valencia

International[change | change source]

Spain U-21

  • UEFA European Under-21 Championship runner-up: 1996;[26] third place 1994[27]

Manager[change | change source]

Maccabi Tel Aviv

  • Israeli Premier League: 2013[6]

Red Bull Salzburg

Individual[change | change source]

  • Football League Manager of the Month: November 2013[9]


Other websites[change | change source]

References[change | change source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 "ÓSCAR GARCÍA Junyent". El Mundo (in Spanish). Retrieved 17 November 2021.
  2. Cubero, Cristina (21 July 1996). "Mágico gol de Óscar" [Óscar wonder goal]. Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish). Retrieved 17 November 2021.
  3. Cubero, Cristina (23 July 1996). "Óscar, otra vez vital" [Óscar, crucial again]. Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish). Retrieved 17 November 2021.
  4. "Òscar García será el segundo entrenador de la selección catalana de fútbol" [Òscar García will be assistant coach in Catalan national team]. La Vanguardia (in Spanish). 16 November 2009. Retrieved 16 November 2021.
  5. גארסיה חתם לשנתיים במכבי: הגעתי למועדון פאר [Óscar García signed a two-year contract with Maccabi Tel Aviv] (in Hebrew). One. 22 May 2012. Retrieved 22 May 2012.
  6. 6.0 6.1 "Òscar Garcia: debut y campeón" [Òscar Garcia: debut and champion]. Sport (in Spanish). 23 April 2013. Retrieved 23 April 2013.
  7. Sinai, Allon (22 May 2013). "Oscar Garcia walks out on Maccabi Tel Aviv". The Jerusalem Post. Retrieved 6 November 2021.
  8. Fifield, Dominic (26 June 2013). "Brighton appoint Oscar García as head coach to replace Gus Poyet". The Guardian. Retrieved 6 November 2021.
  9. 9.0 9.1 Owen, Brian (6 December 2013). "Oscar lands manager of the month award". The Argus. Retrieved 27 October 2021.
  10. "Brighton & Hove Albion head coach Oscar Garcia resigns". BBC Sport. 12 May 2014. Retrieved 12 May 2014.
  11. "Maccabi Tel Aviv manager resigns over Gaza conflict". The Irish Independent. 26 August 2014. Retrieved 6 November 2021.
  12. Smith, Frank (2 September 2014). "Ex-Brighton & Hove Albion boss Oscar Garcia appointed as Watford's new head coach". Watford Observer. Retrieved 2 September 2014.
  13. "Watford: Oscar Garcia replaced by Billy McKinlay as head coach". BBC Sport. 29 September 2014. Retrieved 6 November 2021.
  14. "Former Barca player Oscar Garcia appointed Salzburg coach". USA Today. 28 December 2015. Retrieved 10 July 2020.
  15. 15.0 15.1 15.2 "Oscar Garcia named St Etienne coach on two-year contract". ESPN FC. 15 June 2017. Retrieved 14 July 2017.
  16. "Saint-Etienne manager Oscar Garcia replaced by Julien Sable". ESPN. 15 November 2017. Retrieved 14 December 2017.
  17. Wood, Graham (5 January 2018). "Soccer-Olympiakos Piraeus appoint Spaniard Oscar Garcia as head coach". Reuters. Retrieved 5 January 2018.
  18. Stapatopoulos, Vangelis (3 April 2018). "Τέλος ο Γκαρθία μία ημέρα μετά την κατσάδα Μαρινάκη!" [García sacked one day after Marinakis!] (in Greek). Contra. Retrieved 3 April 2018.
  19. "Óscar García, nuevo entrenador del Celta de Vigo" [Óscar García, new Celta de Vigo manager]. La Vanguardia (in Spanish). 4 November 2019. Retrieved 6 November 2019.
  20. Lowe, Sid (20 July 2020). "Silence, solitude and sadness for Leganés after desperate La Liga finale". The Guardian. Retrieved 21 July 2020.
  21. "Óscar García no continuará como entrenador del RC Celta" [Óscar García will not continue as RC Celta manager] (in Spanish). Celta Vigo. 9 November 2020. Retrieved 9 November 2020.
  22. "Oscar Garcia, nouvel entraîneur de Reims" [Oscar Garcia, new Reims manager] (in French). Ligue 1. 23 June 2021. Retrieved 17 August 2021.
  23. Tomàs, Manel; Clos, Jordi (29 October 2009). "Barça brothers". FC Barcelona. Archived from the original on 9 December 2012. Retrieved 4 November 2009.
  24. Óscar García management career statistics at Soccerbase
  25. Tejedor Carnicero, José Vicente; Torre, Raúl; Lozano Ferrer, Carles. "Spain – List of Super Cup Finals". RSSSF. Retrieved 17 November 2021.
  26. "Italia ya ganó un Europeo a España en el 1996" [Italy have already won European Championships against Spain in 1996] (in Spanish). Orgullo Bianconero. 18 June 2013. Archived from the original on 13 November 2013. Retrieved 13 November 2013.
  27. Aguilar, Francesc (16 April 1994). "España pierde la inocencia" [Spain lose innocence]. Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish). Retrieved 31 July 2020.