Adult Use of Marijuana Act

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The Adult Use of Marijuana Act (also known as AUMA or Proposition 64) was a 2016 voter initiative that legalized Cannabis in California. The full name of the measure was the "Control, Regulate and Tax Adult Use of Marijuana Act".[1] A similar initiative was on the ballot in 2010, Proposition 19. It did not pass. The initiative passed with 56% voter approval and became law on November 9, 2016.[2][3][4]

Content[change | change source]

The initiative made recreational cannabis legal for anyone over the age of 21. It also allowed people to grow marijuana plants and sell them. The state would then be able to tax the sale of purchase of the substance.

AUMA allows adults to carry up to an ounce of marijuana.[5] They can also grow up to six marijuana plants in their home. Marijuana packaging would be required to provide the net weight, origin, age, and type of the product, as well as how much of tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiol, and other cannabinoids are in the product. It must also provide any information about if any pesticides were used during the production.

Smoking marijuana in public is still illegal, and anyone caught doing so will have to pay a $100 fine.[5] Driving under the influence of marijuana is also still illegal. The penalty for unlicensed sale of marijuana is now reduced from four years in state prison to six months in county jail.

60% of the revenue from the new cannabis taxes is going towards to youth programs, 20% to environmental damage cleanup, and 20% to public safety.

Polling[change | change source]

Public opinion on the legalization of recreational marijuana in California
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
% support % opposition % Undecided/Don't Know
Smith Johnson Research Archived 2016-10-28 at the Wayback Machine August 17–19, 2016 500 ± 4.4% 56% 40% 5%
Probolsky Research Archived 2016-09-10 at the Wayback Machine August 5–8, 2016 1,020 ± 3.1% 61.8% 34.9% 3.3%
Institute of Governmental Studies June 29–July 18, 2016 3,020 ± 0% 63.8% 36.2% 0%
Public Policy Institute of California May 13–22, 2016 996 ± 4.3% 60% 37% 3%
1,704 ± 3.3% 55% 43% 3%
Probolsky Research Archived 2016-08-04 at the Wayback Machine February 11–14, 2016 1,000 ± 3.1% 59.9% 36.7% 3.4%
Public Policy Institute of California May 17–27, 2015 1,048 ± 4.6% 56% 41% 3%
1,706 ± 3.6% 54% 44% 2%

Results[change | change source]

Results of the initiative by county.
  Yes
  No

The results were determined on 8 November 2016.

Proposition 64
Choice Votes %
Bueno-verde.png Yes 7,979,041 57.13%
X mark.svg No 5,987,020 42.87%
Total votes 13,966,061 100%

By county[change | change source]

[6]

County Yes# Yes% No# No% Total Votes
Alameda 417,599 66.40% 211,277 33.60% 628,876
Alpine 370 62.29% 224 37.71% 594
Amador 8,607 48.09% 9,291 51.91% 17,898
Butte 51,034 53.31% 44,697 46.69% 95,731
Calaveras 11,114 47.38% 12,341 52.62% 23,455
Colusa 2,858 43.75% 3,675 56.25% 6,533
Contra Costa 281,832 60.72% 182,350 39.28% 464,182
Del Norte 5,674 59.49% 3,863 40.51% 9,537
El Dorado 47,047 49.93% 47,170 50.07% 94,217
Fresno 132,764 47.13% 148,923 52.87% 281,687
Glenn 4,412 46.65% 5,046 53.35% 9,458
Humboldt 34,692 58.45% 24,666 41.55% 59,358
Imperial 20,908 45.31% 25,236 54.69% 46,144
Inyo 4,428 54.90% 3,637 45.10% 8,065
Kern 111,932 46.30% 129,808 53.70% 241,740
Kings 14,562 43.59% 18,847 56.41% 33,409
Lake 14,231 58.59% 10,058 41.41% 24,289
Lassen 4,839 45.61% 5,771 54.39% 10,610
Los Angeles 1,980,546 59.54% 1,345,826 40.46% 3,326,372
Madera 19,348 44.75% 23,883 55.25% 43,231
Marin 96,201 69.61% 42,003 30.39% 138,204
Mariposa 4,618 51.35% 4,375 48.65% 8,993
Mendocino 20,333 54.27% 17,135 45.73% 37,468
Merced 35,984 51.48% 33,916 48.52% 69,900
Modoc 1,756 46.20% 2,045 53.80% 3,801
Mono 3,303 61.58% 2,061 38.42% 5,364
Monterey 83,673 62.64% 49,904 37.36% 133,577
Napa 36,731 61.15% 23,333 38.85% 60,064
Nevada 29,342 52.94% 26,083 47.06% 55,425
Orange 619,701 52.02% 571,646 47.98% 1,191,347
Placer 89,333 48.14% 96,228 51.86% 185,561
Plumas 5,101 52.21% 4,669 47.79% 9,770
Riverside 384,018 52.92% 341,609 47.08% 725,627
Sacramento 300,485 54.23% 253,571 45.77% 554,056
San Benito 12,113 55.46% 9,729 44.54% 21,842
San Bernardino 336,736 52.54% 304,223 47.46% 640,959
San Diego 744,836 57.02% 561,478 42.98% 1,306,314
San Francisco 295,284 74.26% 102,347 25.74% 397,631
San Joaquin 115,205 51.85% 107,001 48.15% 222,206
San Luis Obispo 78,114 57.71% 57,234 42.29% 135,348
San Mateo 195,665 62.96% 115,088 37.04% 310,753
Santa Barbara 108,228 61.51% 67,715 38.49% 175,943
Santa Clara 406,385 58.29% 290,786 41.71% 697,171
Santa Cruz 89,253 69.89% 38,450 30.11% 127,703
Shasta 38,650 48.54% 40,978 51.46% 79,628
Sierra 941 51.00% 904 49.00% 1,845
Siskiyou 10,668 51.79% 9,932 48.21% 20,600
Solano 96,257 58.39% 68,597 41.61% 164,854
Sonoma 136,358 59.07% 94,475 40.93% 230,833
Stanislaus 86,389 50.21% 85,654 49.79% 172,043
Sutter 14,954 45.59% 17,847 54.41% 32,801
Tehama 11,495 48.53% 12,192 51.47% 23,687
Trinity 2,880 50.05% 2,874 49.95% 5,754
Tulare 50,531 45.00% 61,760 55.00% 112,291
Tuolumne 13,461 52.29% 12,283 47.71% 25,744
Ventura 194,918 55.56% 155,902 44.44% 350,820
Yolo 49,624 60.46% 32,455 39.54% 82,079
Yuba 10,720 47.29% 11,949 52.71% 22,669
Totals 7,979,041 57.13% 5,987,020 42.87% 13,966,061

References[change | change source]

  1. Olson Hagel & Fishburn LLP (December 7, 2015), Initiative documents for the Control, Regulate and Tax Adult Use of Marijuana Act (amended) (PDF), 15-0103 – via California Office of the Attorney General
  2. 2016 General Election: State Ballot Measure - Statewide Results, California Secretary of State, November 9, 2016, archived from the original on November 5, 2010, retrieved November 11, 2016
  3. Patrick McGreevy (November 8, 2016), "Californians vote to legalize recreational use of marijuana in the state", The Los Angeles Times
  4. Will Houston (November 7, 2016), "Know your rights post-Prop. 64", Eureka Times-Standard, archived from the original on November 9, 2016, retrieved November 11, 2016
  5. 5.0 5.1 Margolis, Jacob (6 September 2016). "California Report: 6 Ways Recreational Pot Would Change California — and 7 Ways It Wouldn't". KPCC. Archived from the original on 5 November 2016. Retrieved 4 November 2016.
  6. "California Proposition 64 — Legalize Marijuana — Results: Approved – Election Results 2016 – The New York Times". The New York Times. Retrieved 29 May 2018.

Other websites[change | change source]