Andromeda (constellation)

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Andromeda
Constellation
Andromeda
AbbreviationAnd
GenitiveAndromedae
Pronunciation/ænˈdrɒmɨdə/, genitive /ænˈdrɒmɨdiː/
SymbolismAndromeda,
the Woman Chained[1]
Right ascension1
Declination+40
QuadrantNQ1
Area722 sq. deg. (19th)
Main stars4, 18
Bayer/Flamsteed
stars
65
Stars with planets8
Stars brighter than 3.00m3
Stars within 10.00 pc (32.62 ly)3
Brightest starα And (Alpheratz) (2.07m)
Messier objects3
Meteor showersAndromedids (Bielids)
Bordering
constellations
Perseus
Cassiopeia
Lacerta
Pegasus
Pisces
Triangulum
Visible at latitudes between +90° and −40°.
Best visible at 21:00 (9 p.m.) during the month of November.
Andromeda Constellation chart

Andromeda is a constellation in the northern sky. It is named after the princess Andromeda in Greek mythology. It is sometimes called "the Chained Lady" or "the Chained Woman" in English.[2] It has also been called Persea ("Perseus's wife")[2] or Cepheis ("Cepheus's daughter").[2] The astronomer named Ptolemy listed Andromeda when he made a list of 48 constellations. It is also one of the 88 constellations made by the International Astronomical Union.[3]

The Andromeda Galaxy is inside Andromeda, so it has the same name. It is the closest spiral galaxy to Earth.[4] The brightest star in Andromeda is called Alpha Andromedae, which is a binary star.[5]

References[change | change source]

  1. Allen (1899) p.31.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Allen (1899) pp.32, 33.
  3. Ridpath, Ian. "Chapter One continued". Star Tales. Retrieved 28 Jan 2013.
  4. Schoening, Bill; Harvey, Vanessa. "The Andromeda Galaxy". REU program/NOAO/AURA/NSF. Retrieved 28 Jan 2013.
  5. Darling, David. "Alpheratz (Alpha Andromedae)". Retrieved 28 Jan 2013.