Camp David

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Camp David lodge showing the swimming pool

Camp David is an official residence of the President of the United States.[1] It is northwest of Washington D.C., in Catoctin Mountain park. Staffing is provided by the U.S. Navy and the U.S. Marine Corps. Its official name is Naval Support Facility Thurmont.[2]

History[change | change source]

President Franklin D. Roosevelt had it built to escape the hot summers in Washington, D.C.[2] At the time he called it "Shangri-La. In 1953 President Dwight D. Eisenhower renamed it Camp David after his grandson David Eisenhower.[2] During the presidency of Jimmy Carter, The Camp David Accords were signed by Egyptian President Anwar El Sadat and Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin on 17 September 1978.[3] This followed twelve days of secret meetings at Camp David.[3]

Security problems[change | change source]

  • On September 14, 2005, an 81 year old former worker who helped build Camp David walked onto the grounds to voice his concerns over security problems.[4] He was later fined $15.[4]
  • On July 2, 2011, an F-15 escorted a small two-seat plane out of the area of the camp, while Barack Obama lived stayed there. They were released without charge.
  • On July 10, 2011 an f-15 escorted another small two-seater plane out of the area of the camp, while Barack Obama lived stayed there.

References[change | change source]

  1. "Camp David". The White House. Retrieved 22 April 2016. 
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 "Naval Support Facility Thurmont". Military Bases US. Retrieved 22 April 2016. 
  3. 3.0 3.1 Camp David Accords – Israeli Ministry of Foreign Affairs
  4. 4.0 4.1 Alison Walker (18 January 2006). "Former Camp David worker gets his message across with security breach". The Frederick News-Post. Retrieved 22 April 2016.