Canadian French

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Canadian French (French: français canadien) includes the varieties of the French language spoken in Canada. In the 2011 census about 10 million people said they could speak French in a conversation.[1] French is the mother tongue of about 7.3 million Canadians.[1] 7.9 million said they spoke French at home.[1] French is the official language of Quebec.[2] But many government services are conducted in English.[1] Manitoba[3] and New Brunswick[4] are the only provinces in Canada that are officially bilingual.[5] There are differences between the French spoken in Paris (called metropolitan French) and Canadian French.[6] When the first French immigrants came to Canada they spoke French as it was spoken in France at that time. Since then, Parisian (metropolitan) French has become the normal language in France.[6] However both languages are very similar.[7]

References[change | change source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 "French and the francophonie in Canada". Statistics Canada. Retrieved 22 February 2015. 
  2. "Official Language Act (1974)". University of Ottawa. Retrieved 22 February 2015. 
  3. "Bilingualism in Manitoba". www.gov.mb.ca. Manitoba government. Retrieved 27 June 2016. 
  4. "FAQ". officiallanguages.nb.ca. Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages for New Brunswick. Retrieved 27 June 2016. 
  5. "Where in Canada do They Speak French". LoveToKnow Corp. Retrieved 22 February 2015. 
  6. 6.0 6.1 "European French vs Canadian French". SanTranslate.com. Retrieved 22 February 2015. 
  7. Douglas C. Walker, French Sound Structure (Calgary: University of Calgary Press, 2001), p. 6