Concussion

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The arrows show the main forces in a concussion
CT scan, the arrows show places where bleeding occurred.
Rotational force is key in concussion. Punches in boxing deliver more rotational force to the head than impacts in sports such as American football;boxing carries a higher risk of concussion than football.[1]

Concussion is an injury to the brain caused by being hit on the head, as often happens in motor vehicle collisions, fights or contact sports such as football. It is the most common form of traumatic brain injury. Related terms include mild brain injury, mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI), mild head injury (MHI), and minor head trauma. People suffering from it are usually monitored in hospital. The main reason for this is the risk of bleeding in the brain; this is common, and can be life-threatening.

Common symptoms of concussion include: headache, dizziness, fatigue, problems with vision, confusion and loss of consciousness. A person with a mild concussion may have nothing more than a headache or brief confusion. In more severe cases, symptoms tend to last longer, and may include loss of consciousness.

Symptoms may last less than a week in minor cases, but recovery from more severe concussions can take up to 4 weeks.

The most common causes of concussions are accidents; in some cases, wearing a helmet can help prevent major damage.

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