Cyclopropane

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Cyclopropane[1]
Cyclopropane - displayed formula
Cyclopropane - skeletal formula
Cyclopropane-3D-balls.png
Cyclopropane-3D-vdW.png
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
Cyclopropane[2]
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChEBI
ChEMBL
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.000.771
KEGG
PubChem {{{value}}}
UNII
SMILES {{{value}}}
Properties
C3H6
Molar mass 42.08 g/mol
Appearance Colorless gas
Odor Sweet smelling
Density 1.879 g/L (1 atm, 0 °C)
Melting point −128 °C (−198 °F; 145 K)
Boiling point −33 °C (−27 °F; 240 K)
Acidity (pKa) ~46
-39.9·10−6 cm3/mol
Hazards
Main hazards Highly flammable
Asphyxiant
NFPA 704

NFPA 704.svg

4
1
0
 
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
☒N verify (what is ☑Y☒N ?)
Infobox references

Cyclopropane is the cycloalkane molecule with the formula C
3
H
6
, with three carbon atoms connected to each other in a ring structure, and each carbon atom being connected to two hydrogen atoms. The ring is very small, and ring strain can take place because of this.

Cyclopropane is an anesthetic, meaning inhaling large quantities of the gas form that evaporates can send somebody to sleep, however today, other chemicals are used by medical professionals. It is also very reactive, and can explode when mixed with oxygen.

References[change | change source]

  1. Merck Index, 11th Edition, 2755.
  2. Nomenclature of Organic Chemistry : IUPAC Recommendations and Preferred Names 2013 (Blue Book). Cambridge: The Royal Society of Chemistry. 2014. p. 137. doi:10.1039/9781849733069-FP001. ISBN 978-0-85404-182-4.