Event horizon

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For the movie, see Event Horizon

General relativity
G_{\mu \nu} + \Lambda g_{\mu \nu}= {8\pi G\over c^4} T_{\mu \nu}
Einstein field equations
Phenomena
Kepler problem · Lenses · Waves
Frame-dragging · Geodetic effect
Event horizon · Singularity
Black hole

In general relativity, an event horizon is a part of a black hole. Imagine the black hole to be like a ball that you could see in a large spot of emptiness. The event horizon would then be an outer bubble that surrounds that ball. It would be like a little circle inside a bigger circle. The space between the little circle and the big circle would be the event horizon. If an object goes past the event horizon, it can never get away from it. Light that is emitted from the side of the event horizon near the black hole can never reach an observer on the other side. If an observer saw an object fall into a black hole, it would look like the object was stuck at the event horizon forever. The reason this happens is because of the gravity of the black hole slowing down time around it, making it look like the object will take an infinite amount of time to reach it.