French franc

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French franc
franc français  (French)
50 and 100 francs 200 and 500 francs
50 and 100 francs 200 and 500 francs
ISO 4217 Code FRF (1960–2002)
User(s) None; previously:
France, Monaco, Andorra (until 2002); Saar, Saarland (until 1959)
ERM
Since 13 March 1979
Fixed rate since 31 December 1998
Replaced by €, non cash 1 January 1999
Replaced by €, cash 17 February 2002
= 6.55957 F
Pegged by KMF, XAF & XOF, XPF, ADF, MCF
Subunit
1100 centime
Symbol F or Fr (briefly also NF during the 1960s; also unofficially FF and ₣)
Nickname balles (1 F);[1] sacs (10 F); bâton, brique, patate, plaque (10,000 F)
Coins
Freq. used 5, 10, 20 centimes, ​12 F, 1 F, 2 F, 5 F, 10 F
Rarely used 1 centime, 20 F
Banknotes
Freq. used 20 F, 50 F, 100 F, 200 F, 500 F
Central bank Banque de France
Website http://www.banque-france.fr
Mint Monnaie de Paris
Website http://www.monnaiedeparis.com
This infobox shows the latest status before this currency was rendered obsolete.

The franc (/fræŋk/; French: [fʁɑ̃]; sign: F or Fr), also commonly known as the French franc (FF), was a currency of France. It is no longer in used after the introduction of the euro (for coins and banknotes) in 2002.

References[change | change source]

  1. de Goncourt, E. & J. (1860), Charles Demailly, p. 107