Harry Kane

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Harry Kane
Harry Kane in Russia 2.jpg
Kane with England at the 2018 FIFA World Cup
Personal information
Full name Harry Edward Kane
Date of birth (1993-07-28) 28 July 1993 (age 25)[1]
Place of birth Walthamstow, England
Height 6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)[2]
Playing position Striker
Club information
Current team
Tottenham Hotspur
Number 10
Youth career
1999–2001 Ridgeway Rovers
2001–2002 Arsenal
2002–2004 Ridgeway Rovers
2004 Watford
2004–2009 Tottenham Hotspur
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
2009– Tottenham Hotspur 150 (108)
2011Leyton Orient (loan) 18 (5)
2012Millwall (loan) 22 (7)
2012–2013Norwich City (loan) 3 (0)
2013Leicester City (loan) 13 (2)
National team
2010 England U17 3 (2)
2010–2012 England U19 14 (6)
2013 England U20 3 (1)
2013–2015 England U21 14 (8)
2015– England 28 (19)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 15:59, 7 July 2018 (UTC)
‡ National team caps and goals correct as of 15:59, 7 July 2018 (UTC)

Harry Edward Kane (born 28 July 1993) is an English professional footballer. He plays as a striker for Tottenham Hotspur and the English national team.

Early life[change | change source]

Harry Edward Kane was born in Walthamstow, London. His parents are called Kim and Patrick Kane. He has one older brother, Charlie.[3][4] His father is irish and was born in Galway.[5] The family moved to Chingford, Harry attended Larkswood Primary Academy there until 2004,[6][7] then he attended Chingford Foundation School (Also David Beckham attended it).[8] Kane said about his childhood:

I think the sporting genes come from my Mum's side of the family although the topic is a hot debate in the Kane household. Dad probably won't like me saying that, but I think my granddad Eric on my Mum's side was quite a good footballer, and played at a decent level.[9]

Kane also said: "Most of my family were Spurs fans and I grew up 15 minutes from the ground, so I was always going to be a Spurs fan".[9] He said that when he was a child he wanted to be like Teddy Sheringham, he thought of him as a "great finisher" and a role model because he scores a lot of goals.[10]

statistics[change | change source]

Club[change | change source]

As of end of 2017–18 season
Kane (left) playing for Tottenham Hotspur in 2015
Kane captaining Tottenham Hotspur in 2016
Appearances and goals by club, season and competition
Club Season League FA Cup League Cup Europe Other Total
Division Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Tottenham Hotspur 2009–10 Premier League 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2010–11 Premier League 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2011–12 Premier League 0 0 0 0 6[a] 1 6 1
2012–13 Premier League 1 0 0 0 1 0
2013–14 Premier League 10 3 0 0 2 1 7[a] 0 19 4
2014–15 Premier League 34 21 2 0 6 3 9[a] 7 51 31
2015–16 Premier League 38 25 4 1 1 0 7[a] 2 50 28
2016–17 Premier League 30 29 3 4 0 0 5[b] 2 38 35
2017–18[11] Premier League 37 30 4 4 0 0 7[c] 7 48 41
Total 150 108 13 9 9 4 41 19 213 140
Leyton Orient (loan) 2010–11 League One 18 5 0 0 18 5
Millwall (loan) 2011–12 Championship 22 7 5 2 27 9
Norwich City (loan) 2012–13 Premier League 3 0 1 0 1 0 5 0
Leicester City (loan) 2012–13 Championship 13 2 2[d] 0 15 2
Career total 206 122 19 11 10 4 41 19 2 0 278 156
  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Appearances in UEFA Europa League
  2. Three appearances and two goals in UEFA Champions League, two appearances in UEFA Europa League
  3. Appearances in UEFA Champions League
  4. Appearances in Championship play-offs

International[change | change source]

Appearances and goals by national team and year
National team Year Apps Goals
England 2015 8 3
2016 9 2
2017 6 7
Total 23 12

International goals[change | change source]

As of match played 8 October 2017.
International goals by date, venue, cap, opponent, score, result and competition
No. Date Stadium Cap Opponent Score Result Competition Ref.
1 27 March 2015 Wembley Stadium, London, England 1  Lithuania 4–0 4–0 UEFA Euro 2016 qualification
2 5 September 2015 San Marino Stadium, Serravalle, San Marino 3  San Marino 5–0 6–0 UEFA Euro 2016 qualification
3 8 September 2015 Wembley Stadium, London, England 4   Switzerland 1–0 2–0 UEFA Euro 2016 qualification
4 26 March 2016 Olympiastadion, Berlin, Germany 9  Germany 1–2 3–2 Friendly [12]
5 22 May 2016 City of Manchester Stadium, Manchester, England 11  Turkey 1–0 2–1 Friendly
6 10 June 2017 Hampden Park, Glasgow, Scotland 18  Scotland 2–2 2–2 2018 FIFA World Cup qualification
7 13 June 2017 Stade de France, Saint-Denis, France 19  France 1–0 2–3 Friendly [13]
8 2–2
9 1 September 2017 National Stadium, Ta' Qali, Malta 20  Malta 1–0 4–0 2018 FIFA World Cup qualification [14]
10 4–0
11 5 October 2017 Wembley Stadium, London, England 22  Slovenia 1–0 1–0 2018 FIFA World Cup qualification [15]
12 8 October 2017 LFF Stadium, Vilnius, Lithuania 23  Lithuania 1–0 1–0 2018 FIFA World Cup qualification [16]

Honours[change | change source]

Tottenham Hotspur

Individual

References[change | change source]

  1. "Harry Kane". 11v11.com. AFS Enterprises. Retrieved 6 December 2017.
  2. "Harry Kane: Overview". Premier League. Retrieved 13 December 2017.
  3. "Harry Kane". Tottenham Hotspur F.C.
  4. Dunne, John (27 March 2015). "One day I'll play for England: London schoolboy's dream is about to come true". London Evening Standard. Retrieved 2 February 2018.
  5. "Let's forget about Harry Kane for Ireland, he's after getting an England call-up". The 42. 28 March 2015.
  6. Glanvill, Natalie (16 July 2015). "New sporting talent unearthed at Harry Kane's primary school". East London and West Sussex Guardian. Retrieved 2 February 2018.
  7. "Larkswood Primary Academy Newsletter" (PDF). 9 February 2015.
  8. "Hall of Fame". Chingford Foundation School PE Department. Retrieved 3 May 2017.
  9. 9.0 9.1 Worrall, Frank (18 May 2017). "Chapter 1: Beginnings". Harry Kane – The Biography. John Blake Publishing Ltd. ISBN 9781786065384.
  10. Peach, Simon (25 April 2014). "Harry Kane: Teddy Sheringham has been a great role model for me". The Independent. London. Retrieved 2 February 2018.
  11. "Premier League: Tottenham goal at Stoke awarded to Harry Kane". BBC Sport. 11 April 2018. Retrieved 11 April 2018.
  12. McNulty, Phil (26 March 2016). "Germany 2–3 England". BBC Sport. Retrieved 29 May 2016.
  13. McNulty, Phil (13 June 2017). "France 3–2 England". BBC Sport. Retrieved 13 June 2017.
  14. McNulty, Phil (1 September 2017). "Malta 0–4 England". BBC Sport. Retrieved 2 September 2017.
  15. McNulty, Phil (5 October 2017). "England 1–0 Slovenia". BBC Sport. Retrieved 5 October 2017.
  16. McNulty, Phil (8 October 2017). "Lithuania 0–1 England". BBC Sport. Retrieved 8 October 2017.
  17. "Tottenham Hotspur Player of the Year 1987 to 2016–17". My Football Facts. Retrieved 2 February 2018.
  18. Brown, Luke (21 May 2017). "Tottenham striker Harry Kane wins the Premier League's Golden Boot for the second season in a row". The Independent. London. Retrieved 22 May 2017.
  19. "Harry Kane wins PFA Fans' Premier League Player of the Season award". Sky Sports. 27 May 2017. Retrieved 2 February 2018.
  20. http://www.fsf.org.uk/. "Harry Kane wins FSF Player of the Year | Football Supporters' Federation". www.fsf.org.uk. Retrieved 2018-03-20.
  21. "Harry Kane and Jordan Pickford named England senior and U21s' Players of the Year". The Football Association. 22 January 2018. Retrieved 22 January 2018.
  22. "2016-2017 World 11: the Reserve Teams - FIFPro World Players' Union". FIFPro.org. 23 October 2017. Retrieved 4 April 2018.

Other websites[change | change source]