Iraq Inquiry

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The Iraq Inquiry is a public inquiry into the United Kingdom's role in the Iraq War. It is also called the Chilcot Inquiry after its chairman, Sir John Chilcot.[1][2]

The inquiry was announced on 15 June 2009 by Prime Minister Gordon Brown. The original announcement was that the inquiry would take place in private. This decision was later reversed after receiving criticism in the media and the House of Commons.[3][4][5]

On 6 July 2016, Sir John Chilcot announced the report's publication, more than seven years after the inquiry was announced. It referred to as the Chilcot report by the news media, the document stated that Saddam Hussein was not an urgent threat and that the Iraq War was not necessary.

References[change | change source]

  1. My alternative to another round of Iraq whitewashing The Guardian, 31 July 2009
  2. Investigate UK abuses in Iraq The Guardian, 14 August 2009
  3. Iraq war inquiry to be in private BBC News, 15 June 2009
  4. UK PM announces Iraq war inquiry Al Jazeera, 15 June 2009
  5. Siddique, Haroon (22 June 2009). "Public Iraq war inquiry 'essential', says chairman". London: The Guardian. Retrieved 24 November 2009.