Jewish-American organized crime

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Jewish Mafia
Bugsy Siegel.jpg
Bugsy Siegel was instrumental in the creation of Las Vegas
FoundedLate 19th century
InNew York City and various towns of the East Coast
Founded byArnold Rothstein
Years activeLate 19th century–Present
TerritoryUnited States; active mostly in New York City, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Chicago, Detroit, Los Angeles and Florida
EthnicityJewish, Jewish-American, Italian-American and Jewish-Italian
Criminal activitiesNarcotics trafficking, racketeering, gambling, loan sharking, bookmaking, contract killing, diamond trafficking, extortion, weapons trafficking, fraud, prostitution, bootlegging and money laundering
AlliesItalian American Mafia, Israeli mafia, Russian mafia, various criminal organizations in the U.S., in Australia and Canada

Jewish-American organized crime emerged within the American Jewish community during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. It has been referred to variously in media and popular culture as the Jewish Mob, Jewish Mafia, Kosher Mafia, Kosher Nostra,[1][2] or Undzer Shtik (Yiddish: אונדזער שטיק‎).[a][2]

References[change | change source]

  1. "Forgetting sixth commandment: Jewish gangsters were once known in organized crime circles as the 'Kosher Nostra'", The Jewish Independent, September 19, 2008
  2. 2.0 2.1 Tyler, Gus (June 22, 1970). "Book of the Week: The Kosher Nostra". New York Magazine. 3 (25). p. 50. Retrieved 27 February 2015.

Notes[change | change source]

  1. Related to Middle High German: unser stück - literally 'our piece,' 'our share,' 'our thing.' Also compare to Dutch: onze stuk, Afrikaans: ons stuk, West Frisian: ús stik.