Knowledge

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Knowledge means the things which are true, as opposed to opinion. Information which is correct is knowledge. Knowledge can always be supported by evidence.[source?]That makes it justified; it is not an opinion or a guess.

If someone understands an idea or is aware of something, then he or she has knowledge of it. When it makes sense to someone, this knowledge becomes understanding. A knowledgeable person is someone who knows a lot. If someone has know-how it means that they can put knowledge to work in doing or building something.

Where it comes from[change | edit source]

Knowledge comes from being in an environment, having some experience there, and then sharing what was learned. That way others may gain from what someone else knows.

Types of knowledge[change | edit source]

When doing science, it may be necessary to set up a strict experiment. Then the experience is repeatable and others may repeat it afterwards.

Other types of knowledge[change | edit source]

Other types of knowledge can be for a more specific purpose, for example learning a language. In business, computers help to record and share what employees know.

Religion and knowledge[change | edit source]

In many expressions of Christianity, such as Catholicism and Anglicanism, knowledge is one of the seven gifts of the Holy Spirit.[1] In the Garden of Eden knowledge is the factor that made humans greedy and treacherous. But in the Book of Proverbs it states: 'to be wise you must first obey the LORD' (9:10)

In Islam, knowledge (Arabic: علم, ʿilm) is given great significance. "The All-Knowing" (al-ʿAlīm) is one of the Names of God, reflecting distinct properties of God in Islam. The Qur'an asserts that knowledge comes from God (2:239) and various hadith encourage getting knowledge. Muhammad is reported to have said "Seek knowledge from the cradle to the grave" and "Verily the men of knowledge are the inheritors of the prophets". Islamic scholars, theologians and jurists are often given the title alim, meaning 'knowledgeable'.

References[change | edit source]

  1. "Part Three, No. 1831". Catechism of the Catholic Church. http://www.scborromeo.org/ccc/p3s1c1a7.htm#1831. Retrieved 2007-04-20.