List of chemicals in doping cases in sport

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List of chemicals used in cases of doping in sport. There have been years, when sportspeople got sanctions (or punishment), if a test showed use of one or more chemicals. There are lists that show which chemicals, that sportspeople are not allowed to use.

Some sportspeople got punishment for using too much of a chemical. (The chemicals on the list, are in alphabetical order.)

  • Acetazolamide (brand name "Diamox"). In 2016 a sportsperson lost an Olympic medal (from 2008).[1]
  • "Carphedon" (brand name), see phenylpiracetam
  • Clenbuterol. In 2012 one sportsperson got punishment, and lost an Olympic medal (from 2004).[2][3]
  • Darbepoetin alfa. In 2002, 3 sportspeople lost Olympic medals (winter Olympics).
  • Dianabol (marketing name), or metandienone. In 1972 a sportsperson got punishment and lost an Olympic medal.[4][5]
  • Furosemide. In 1988, two sportspeople got punishment. Each lost an Olympic medal.
  • "GHRP-2", or Pralmorelin (brand name: GHRP Kaken 100). In 2017 a sportsperson lost an Olympic medal (from 2016).[9]
  • Growth hormone (GH or HGH), also known as somatotropin or somatropin. In 2010 a sportsperson got punishment; he got a "two-year sanction".[10]
  • GW1516. Sportspeople got punishment in 2013.[11][12][13]
  • Meldonium. In 2018, one sportsperson used the chemical, and his team lost its Olympic medal.[14]
  • Metandienone, see Dianabol (marketing name)
  • Methenolone. In 1984, two sportspeople got punishment. Both lost an Olympic medal and (at least) one got an 18-month ban.
  • Methyltestosterone (branded as Android, Metandren, and Testred). In 2008, a sportsperson lost an Olympic medal.[15][16]
  • Methylhexanamine. In 2017 a sportsperson lost an Olympic medal (from 2008).[17]
  • Nandrolone. In between 2000 and 2021, sportspeople got punishment. One lost an Olympic medal and one got a 4-year ban.[15][18][19]
  • Nikethamide, earlier sold as "Coramine". In 1972 two sportspeople used doping; one national sportsteam lost their Olympic medal,[20][21][22][23] and one more sportsperson lost another Olympic medal.[4]
  • Oxandrolone. In 2012 one sportsperson lost an Olympic medal (from 2004).[24][25][15]
  • Phenylpiracetam (INN: fonturacetam); brand names: Carphedon, Phenotropil. In 2006 one sportsperson lost an Olympic medal.
  • Propranolol. In 2008 a sportsperson lost Olympic medals.
  • Pseudoephedrine. In 2000 a sportsperson lost an Olympic medal.[26]
  • Stanozolol. In between 1988 and 2014, sportspeople got punishment.[27] 28 sportspeople lost Olympic medals.
  • Strychnine. In 2016 a sportsperson lost an Olympic medal.[28]
  • Testosterone. In 2019 a sportsperson got punishment.[29]
  • Tuaminoheptane. In 2016 a sportsperson lost an Olympic medal.[30]
  • "Turinabol", or chlorodehydromethyltestosterone, brand name "Oral Turinabol". In 2016 a sportsperson lost an Olympic medal (from 2008).[31]


Related pages[change | change source]

References[change | change source]

  1. Cite error: The named reference IOC 2 re was used but no text was provided for refs named (see the help page).
  2. "INTERNATIONAL OLYMPIC COMMITTEE IOC DISCIPLINARY COMMISSION RECOMMENDATIONS REGARDING OLEG PEREPETCHENOV BORN ON 6 SEPTEMBER 1975, ATHLETE, RUSSIA, WEIGHTLIFTING" (PDF).
  3. Karolos Grochmann: Russian weightlifter stripped of Athens bronze medal Archived 2017-09-20 at the Wayback Machine, thestar.com.my, 13 February 2013
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 Dubin, Charles S. (1990). Commission of Inquiry into the Use of Drugs and Banned Practices Intended to Increase Athletic Performance (part 2, page 214-430) (PDF). Ottawa: Government of Canada Publications. ISBN 0-660-13610-4.
  5. Olympics ban settles doping row, New Straits Times, 2 September 1972
  6. https://www.usada.org/sanction/nicholas-gough-receives-doping-sanction/
  7. https://www.wada-ama.org/sites/default/files/resources/files/2021list_en.pdf. Retrieved 5 July 2021
  8. "Hans-Gunnar Liljenwall". 123explore.com. Retrieved 2008-08-28.
  9. "COURT OF ARBITRATION FOR SPORT (CAS) CONFIRMS THE DECISION RENDERED BY THE INTERNATIONAL CANOE FEDERATION (ICF) IN THE CASE OF SERGHEI TARNOVSCHI" (PDF). Lausanne, Switzerland: Court of Arbitration for Sport. 11 July 2017. Retrieved 12 July 2017.
  10. https://www.triathlon.org/news/article/first_case_athlete_sanction_in_human_growth_hormone_from_uk_anti-doping. Retrieved 6 July 2021
  11. Shane Stokes: GW501516 positives confirmed, three of four riders are from same BCR Pizza Hut team, velonation.com, 15 April 2013
  12. Shane Stokes: Four riders each handed two year bans for use of GW501516, velonation.com 30 July 2013
  13. List of sanctions Archived 2014-07-15 at the Wayback Machine, uci.ch
  14. Barry, Coral (22 February 2018). "Winter Olympics: Russian curler Krushelnitzky stripped of medal for doping". Metro. Retrieved 24 February 2018.
  15. 15.0 15.1 15.2 Cite error: The named reference Beijing 2015 statistics handbook was used but no text was provided for refs named (see the help page).
  16. "Blonska stripped of silver medal". BBC Sport. 22 August 2008.
  17. "IOC sanctions two athletes for failing anti-doping test at Beijing 2008". International Olympic Committee. 7 November 2020.
  18. "Shelby Houlihan Statement On Receiving Four-Year Ban". www.flotrack.org. Retrieved 2021-06-15.
  19. OlympicTalk (2021-06-14). "American record holder Shelby Houlihan receives four-year ban week before Olympic track trials". OlympicTalk | NBC Sports. Retrieved 2021-06-15.
  20. "Glory one moment, gone in the next..." Archived from the original on 6 September 2004. Retrieved 2012-02-14.CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link) Bangladesh Observer, Sports news, September 2004
  21. "Olympic History". Archived from the original on 29 June 2011. Retrieved 2012-07-17.CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link). The Times
  22. Bill Mallon; Jeroen Heijmans (2011). Historical Dictionary of Cycling. Scarecrow Press. pp. xxiv, 68. ISBN 978-0-8108-7369-8.
  23. Aad van den Hoek. sports-reference.com
  24. IOC: INTERNATIONAL OLYMPIC COMMITTEE IOC DISCIPLINARY COMMISSION RECOMMENDATIONS REGARDING YURIY BILONOG BORN ON 9 MARCH 1974, ATHLETE, UKRAINE, ATHLETICS
  25. Cite error: The named reference 2012 retests was used but no text was provided for refs named (see the help page).
  26. "Raducan tests positive for stimulant". ESPN. Associated Press. 26 September 2000.
  27. UCI (10 July 2014). "UCI Doping Suspensions". UCI.ch. Archived from the original on 15 July 2014.
  28. "WEIGHTLIFTING - Izzat Artykov (Kyrgyzstan) disqualified from men's 69kg event and excluded from the Games" (PDF). tas-cas.org. Court of Arbitration for Sport. 18 August 2016. Retrieved 20 August 2016.
  29. https://www.usada.org/sanction/ty-kurth-accepts-doping-sanction/
  30. "CAS AD 16/10 and 16/11. The Anti-doping Division of the Court of Arbitration for Sport Issues Decisions in the Cases of Gabriel Sincraian (ROM/Weightlifting-85kg) and Misha Aloian (RUS/Boxing-52kg)" (PDF). Court of Arbitration for Sport. 8 December 2016. Retrieved 8 December 2016.
  31. Cite error: The named reference IOC2016-11-17 was used but no text was provided for refs named (see the help page).