List of nearest galaxies

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This list of the nearest galaxies to Earth is ordered by increasing distance. Many of the distances are only estimates, and some may be incorrect by 50% or more. The distance ranking in this list should be seen only as a guess. Distances are given in light years (ly).

  1. Milky Way – home galaxy of Earth
  2. Canis Major dwarf – 25,000 ly (satellite of Milky Way)
  3. Segue 1 – 75,000 ly (satellite of Milky Way)
  4. Sag DEG – 81,000 ly (satellite or part of Milky Way)
  5. Large Magellanic Cloud – 160,000 ly (satellite of Milky Way)
  6. Small Magellanic Cloud – 190,000 ly (satellite of Milky Way)
  7. Ursa Minor dwarf – 205,500 ly (satellite of Milky Way)
  8. Draco dwarf – 248,000 ly (satellite of Milky Way)
  9. Sculptor dwarf – 254,000 ly (satellite of Milky Way)
  10. Sextans dwarf – 257,500 ly (satellite of Milky Way)
  11. Carina dwarf – 283,500 ly (satellite of Milky Way)
  12. Fornax dwarf – 427,000 ly (satellite of Milky Way)
  13. Leo II – 701,000 ly
  14. Leo I – 890,000 ly
  15. Phoenix dwarf – 1,271,000 ly
  16. Barnard's galaxy (NGC 6822) – 1,760,000 ly
  17. NGC185 – 2,021,000 ly (satellite of Andromeda)
  18. NGC147 – 2,152,000 ly (satellite of Andromeda)
  19. Andromeda galaxy (M31) – 2,363,000 ly
  20. Messier 32 (NGS 221) – 2,650,000 ly (satellite of Andromeda)
  21. M110 (NGC 205) – 2,363,500 ly (satellite of Andromeda)
  22. Andromeda I – 2,363,500 ly (satellite of Andromeda)
  23. Andromeda II – 2,363,500 ly (satellite of Andromeda)
  24. Andromeda III – 2,363,500 ly (satellite of Andromeda)
  25. LGS 3 – 2,477,500 ly (satellite of Triangulum)
  26. IC 1613 – 2,494,000 ly
  27. Triangulum galaxy (M33) – 2,592,000 ly
  28. Aquarius dwarf – 2,608,000 ly
  29. Tucana dwarf – 2,836,000 ly
  30. Wolf-Lundmark-Melotte (WLM) – 3,064,500 ly

Related pages[change | change source]

References[change | change source]

  1. https://arxiv.org/PS_cache/astro-ph/pdf/0209/0209205v2.pdf
  2. Uson, Juan M. et al (1990). "The central galaxy in Abell 2029 – an old supergiant". Science 250 (4980): 539–540. doi:10.1126/science.250.4980.539.