Maqil

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The Maqil (Arabic: المعقل‎) were an Arabian nomadic tribe. In the 11th century they migrated from Yemen into what is now the Sahara Desert and Morocco.[1] They mainly settled near forests and oases.

Despite their originally small number (less than 200), they were later involved in fighting a dynasty of Sunni Muslims. They also brought change to the culture of these regions, and a new language.

Genealogy[change | change source]

They descend from Yoktan son of Eber, father of the Hebrews and coming from the line of Seth, son of Adam.

History[change | change source]

The exact origin of the Maqil tribe is unknown.[2] They claimed for themselves a prestigious Banu Hashim descent from Jaafar ibn Abi Talib, son of Abu Talib and brother of Ali ibn Abi Talib. Arabian genealogists categorized them as Hilalians.[2] Ibn Khaldun wrote that both of these versions are false, since the Banu Hashim lived in urban cities and weren't nomadic nor ever wandered in desert wolds.[2] He added that the Maqil is a name only found in Yemen.[2]

Ibn Khaldun speculated that they were likely an Arab nomadic group from Yemen, and this is supported by bn al-Kalbi and Ibn Said.[2][3]

Further reading[change | change source]

  • Almsaodi, Abdulaziz. Modern history of Yemen

References[change | change source]

  1. Africana: The Encyclopedia of the African and African American Experience, eds. Anthony Appiah; Henry Louis Gates, Jr., Second Edition (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004), p. 360
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 Ibn Khaldun, Abderahman (1377). تاريخ ابن خلدون: ديوان المبتدأ و الخبر في تاريخ العرب و البربر و من عاصرهم من ذوي الشأن الأكبر. 6. دار الفكر. p. 78.
  3. Ibn Khaldun, Abderahman (1377). تاريخ ابن خلدون: ديوان المبتدأ و الخبر في تاريخ العرب و البربر و من عاصرهم من ذوي الشأن الأكبر. 6. دار الفكر. p. 79.