Mike Gravel

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Mike Gravel
Mike Gravel.png
United States Senator
from Alaska
In office
January 3, 1969 – January 3, 1981
Preceded byErnest Gruening
Succeeded byFrank Murkowski
3rd Speaker of the Alaska House of Representatives
In office
January 25, 1965 – January 22, 1967
Preceded byBruce Kendall
Succeeded byBill Boardman
Member of the Alaska House of Representatives
from the 8th district
In office
January 23, 1963 – January 22, 1967
Preceded byJohn S. Hellenthal
Succeeded byMichael F. Beirne
Personal details
Born
Maurice Robert Gravel

(1930-05-13) May 13, 1930 (age 89)
Springfield, Massachusetts, U.S.
Political partyDemocratic (before 2008; 2010–present)
Libertarian (2008–2010)
Spouse(s)
Rita Martin
(m. 1959; div. 1981)

Whitney Stewart (m. 1984)
Children2
ResidenceSeaside, California, U.S.[1]
EducationAssumption College
American International College
Columbia University (BS)
Signature
WebsiteCampaign website
Military service
Allegiance United States
Branch/service United States Army
Years of service1951–1954
RankUS-O2 insignia.svg First Lieutenant

Maurice Robert Gravel, better known as Mike Gravel (born May 13, 1930) is an American Democratic politician. He was member of the Libertarian Party from 2008 to 2010 when he re-joined the Democratic Party. He served as a United States Senator from Alaska (1969-1981) and, previously, as member of the Alaska House of Representatives (1953-1966, speaker from 1965-1966). Gravel was a two-time presidential candidate in 2008 and in 2020.

Early years[change | change source]

Gravel was born in Springfield, Massachusetts. He studied at Assumption College, American International College and at Columbia University. He moved to Alaska in 1956.

Senate years[change | change source]

From 1953 to 1966, Gravel was a member of the Alaska House of Representatives. From 1965 to 1966, Gravel was Speaker of the Alaska House of Representatives. In 1969, he was elected United States Senator from Alaska.

Gravel is best known for his successful effort to end military draft during the Vietnam War and put the Pentagon Papers into the public record in 1971. He was seen as a possible running mate for George McGovern's 1972 presidential campaign.

Gravel lost to Clark Gruening in the Democratic Party for re-election in the 1980 Senate election.

Presidential campaigns[change | change source]

2008[change | change source]

As a candidate for the Democratic Presidential nomination in 2008 he wanted withdrawal of US Armed Forces from Iraq, more health care and social security, and preventing global warming. He is also one of the earliest and the most famous supporters of direct democracy in the United States.

2020[change | change source]

On March 19, 2019, Gravel created an exploratory committee to run for President once again in the 2020 election.[2] He said he would run not to win the nomination, but to raise awareness of bigger issues.[3] On April 2, 2019, Gravel filed to officially run for office.[4][5] He dropped out of the race on July 31, 2019 after failing to qualify for the debates.[6]

References[change | change source]

  1. Rubin, Sara (July 11, 2019). "Watching the Democratic debate with a Seaside candidate for president". Monterey County Weekly. Retrieved August 5, 2019.
  2. "Mike Gravel for President Exploratory Committee" (PDF). FEC.gov. March 19, 2019. Retrieved March 20, 2019.
  3. MikeGravel (March 19, 2019). "I am considering running in the 2020 Democratic primary. The goal will not be to win, but to bring a critique of American imperialism to the Democratic debate stage. The website (mikegravel.org ) is under construction. Official announcement will be in the coming days" (Tweet).
  4. MikeGravel (April 2, 2019). "It. Is. On. Sen. Mike Gravel has officially filed to run for president. Our only aim is pushing the field left by appearing in the Democratic debates. Donate as little as you like, but help us get to the necessary 65k donors! Official launch is April 8" (Tweet). Retrieved April 3, 2019.
  5. "Statement of Candidacy" (PDF). docquery.fec.gov. 2019.
  6. Forgey, Quint (August 2, 2019). "Gravel and his campaign teens end presidential run". Politico. Retrieved August 3, 2019.

Other websites[change | change source]