2020 United States presidential election

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2020 United States presidential election

← 2016 November 3, 2020 2024 →

538 members of the Electoral College
270 electoral votes needed to win

2020 United States presidential election in California2020 United States presidential election in Oregon2020 United States presidential election in Washington (state)2020 United States presidential election in Idaho2020 United States presidential election in Nevada2020 United States presidential election in Utah2020 United States presidential election in Arizona2020 United States presidential election in Montana2020 United States presidential election in Wyoming2020 United States presidential election in Colorado2020 United States presidential election in New Mexico2020 United States presidential election in North Dakota2020 United States presidential election in South Dakota2020 United States presidential election in Nebraska2020 United States presidential election in Kansas2020 United States presidential election in Oklahoma2020 United States presidential election in Texas2020 United States presidential election in Minnesota2020 United States presidential election in Iowa2020 United States presidential election in Missouri2020 United States presidential election in Arkansas2020 United States presidential election in Louisiana2020 United States presidential election in Wisconsin2020 United States presidential election in Illinois2020 United States presidential election in Michigan2020 United States presidential election in Indiana2020 United States presidential election in Ohio2020 United States presidential election in Kentucky2020 United States presidential election in Tennessee2020 United States presidential election in Mississippi2020 United States presidential election in Alabama2020 United States presidential election in Georgia2020 United States presidential election in Florida2020 United States presidential election in South Carolina2020 United States presidential election in North Carolina2020 United States presidential election in Virginia2020 United States presidential election in West Virginia2020 United States presidential election in the District of Columbia2020 United States presidential election in Maryland2020 United States presidential election in Delaware2020 United States presidential election in Pennsylvania2020 United States presidential election in New Jersey2020 United States presidential election in New York2020 United States presidential election in Connecticut2020 United States presidential election in Rhode Island2020 United States presidential election in Vermont2020 United States presidential election in New Hampshire2020 United States presidential election in Maine2020 United States presidential election in Massachusetts2020 United States presidential election in Hawaii2020 United States presidential election in Alaska2020 United States presidential election in the District of Columbia2020 United States presidential election in Maryland2020 United States presidential election in Delaware2020 United States presidential election in New Jersey2020 United States presidential election in Connecticut2020 United States presidential election in Rhode Island2020 United States presidential election in Massachusetts2020 United States presidential election in Vermont2020 United States presidential election in New HampshireElectoralCollege2020.svg
About this image
The electoral map for the 2020 election, based on populations from the 2010 Census.

Incumbent President

Donald Trump
Republican



The United States presidential election of 2020 will take place on November 3, 2020. Voters will select presidential electors who in turn on December 14, 2020,[1] to either elect a new President and Vice President or re-elect the incumbents. The winners of the 2020 election will be inaugurated on January 20, 2021.

Donald Trump, the 45th and current President, launched a reelection campaign for the Republican primaries; several state Republican Party organizations have cancelled their primaries in a show of support for his candidacy.[2] 27 major candidates launched campaigns for the Democratic nomination, which became the largest field of candidates for any political party in the modern-day American politics.

Background[change | change source]

The 2020 U.S. presidential election will be the first time all members of the millennial generation will be able to vote.[3] The age group of what will then be persons in the 18 to 45-year-old area will represent 40 percent of the United States' eligible voters in 2020.[4] It has also been estimated that 1/5 percent of eligible voters in the 2020 U.S. presidential election will be Hispanic.[4]

Republican Party[change | change source]

Declared candidates[change | change source]

The candidates in this section have held public office or been included in a minimum of five independent national polls.

Withdrawn candidates[change | change source]

Convention site[change | change source]

On July 20, 2018, the Republican National Convention chose Charlotte, North Carolina as the site for their 2020 national convention. The convention will likely be held sometime in July or August 2020.[17]

National polling[change | change source]

Polling Aggregation
Source of poll aggregation Date
updated
Dates
polled
Donald
Trump
Bill
Weld
Mark
Sanford
Joe
Walsh
Undecided[a]
270 to Win Nov 14, 2019 Sep 25 – Nov 13, 2019 86.2% 2.4% 2.2% 1.6% 7.6%
RealClearPolitics Nov 7, 2019 Sep 15 – Nov 5, 2019 85.4% 2.6% 1.8% 2.2% 8.0%
Average 85.8% 2.5% 2.0% 1.9% 7.8%

Democratic Party[change | change source]

Declared candidates[change | change source]

The candidates in this section have held public office and/or been included in a minimum of five independent national polls.

Individuals who have scheduled a formal announcement[change | change source]


Withdrawn candidates[change | change source]

Convention site[change | change source]

The 2020 Democratic National Convention is scheduled to take place in Milwaukee, Wisconsin on July 13–16, 2020.[106][107][108]

National polling[change | change source]

Source of poll aggregation Date
updated
Dates
polled
Joe
Biden
Elizabeth
Warren
Bernie
Sanders
Pete
Buttigieg
Kamala
Harris
Andrew
Yang
Amy
Klobuchar
Cory
Booker
Others[b] Undecided[c]
270 to Win Nov 19, 2019 Nov 3–18, 2019[d] 27.3% 21.0% 18.0% 7.5% 4.3% 3.0% 2.5% 1.8% 7.2%[e] 7.4%
RealClear Politics Nov 19, 2019 Oct 30–Nov 17, 2019 27.0% 20.3% 18.8% 8.3% 4.8% 3.0% 1.8% 1.8% 8.9%[f] 5.3%
The Economist Nov 19, 2019 [g] 25.2% 21.9% 15.7% 7.9% 4.7% 3.3% 2.0% 2.0% 4.5%[h] 12.8%
Average 26.5% 21.1% 17.5% 7.9% 4.6% 3.1% 2.1% 1.9% 6.9%[i] 8.4%

General election polling[change | change source]

Trump vs. Warren
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of Error Donald Trump Elizabeth Warren Undecided
Public Policy Polling[109] 677 March 27–28, 2017 ± 3.8% 43% 48% 9%
Politico/Morning Consult[110] 1,791 February 9–10, 2017 ± 2% 42% 36% 22%
Trump vs. Sanders
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of Error Donald Trump Bernie Sanders Undecided
Public Policy Polling[109] 677 March 27–28, 2017 ± 3.8% 41% 52% 7%
Trump vs. Democratic candidate
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of Error Donald Trump Democratic Candidate Don't Know
Politico/Morning Consult[111] 1,791 February 9–10, 2017 ± 2% 35% 43% 22%

Libertarian Party[change | change source]

Declared candidates and exploratory committees[change | change source]

Individuals who have publicly expressed interest[change | change source]

Individuals in this section have expressed an interest in running for President within the last six months.

Withdrawn candidates[change | change source]

  • Zoltan Istvan, journalist, entrepreneur, former candidate for Governor of California in 2018, Transhumanist nominee for President in 2016. Suspended campaign on January 11, 2019.[124]

Convention site[change | change source]

On December 10, 2017, the Libertarian National Committee chose Austin, Texas as the site of their 2020 national convention. The convention will be held between May 22–25, 2020.[125]

Green Party[change | change source]

Declared candidates[change | change source]

Withdrawn candidates[change | change source]

Convention site[change | change source]

The 2020 Green National Convention will be held in Detroit, Michigan from July 9-12. Greenville, South Carolina and Spartanburg, South Carolina were also considered to host the convention. [137]

Minor or Independent candidates[change | change source]

Reform Party[change | change source]

Declared[change | change source]

Withdrawn candidates[change | change source]

Party for Socialism and Liberation[change | change source]

Nominee[change | change source]

Name Born Experience Home state Campaign Running mate Ref.
Gloria La Riva at Trump inauguration protest SF Jan 20 2017.jpg
Gloria La Riva
(1954-08-13) August 13, 1954 (age 65)
Albuquerque, New Mexico
Activist
Party for Socialism and Liberation nominee for President in 2008 and 2016
Flag of New Mexico.svg
New Mexico
Announced:
September 25, 2019

Won Nomination
September 27, 2019
Leonard Peltier headshot from FBI Poster - 01.gif
Activist
Leonard Peltier
from Florida
[141]

American Solidarity Party[change | change source]

Nominee[change | change source]

Name Born Experience Home state Campaign Running mate Ref.
Brian T. Carroll - head shot .75 aspect ratio.png
Brian T. Carroll
Los Angeles, California Educator
Independent candidate for U.S. Representative in 2018
Flag of California.svg
California
Announced:
April 5, 2019

Won Nomination:
October 1, 2019
Gray - replace this image male.svg
Party Chairman
Amar Patel
from Illinois
[142][143]

Lost nomination[change | change source]

Prohibition Party[change | change source]

Nominee[change | change source]

Name Born Experience Home state Campaign Running mate Ref.
Gray - replace this image male.svg
Phil Collins
Libertyville, Illinois Member of the Libertyville Township Board of Trustees (2013–2016) Flag of Nevada.svg
Nevada
Won Nomination:
October 16, 2019
Gray - replace this image male.svg
Activist
Billy Joe Parker
from Georgia
[147]

Constitution Party[change | change source]

Declared[change | change source]

Independent or unaffiliated[change | change source]

Declared[change | change source]

Name Born Experience Home state Campaign Running mate Ref.
Gray - replace this image male.svg
Mark Charles
Washington, D.C. Activist Flag of the District of Columbia.svg
Washington, D.C.
Announced:
May 30, 2019
[149]
TBD [150]

Individuals who have publicly expressed interest[change | change source]

Individuals in this section have expressed an interest in running for president within the last six months.

Withdrawn candidates[change | change source]

Related pages[change | change source]

Notes[change | change source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 This individual is not a Libertarian Party member, but has been the subject of speculation and/or expressed interest in running under this party.
  1. Calculated by taking the difference of 100% and all other candidates combined
  2. Bloomberg is included in 270 to Win and the Average, even though he is not running as of yet.
  3. Calculated by taking the difference of 100% and all other candidates combined
  4. 270 to Win reports the date each poll was released, not the dates each poll was administered.
  5. Bloomberg with 3.0%; Gabbard with 1.5%; Steyer with 0.8%; Castro with 0.7%; Delaney, Williamson, Bennet, and Bullock with 0.3%; Messam, Patrick and Sestak with 0.0%
  6. Bloomberg with 3.0%; Castro and Gabbard with 1.3%; Delaney and Steyer with 1.0%; Bennet and Bullock with 0.5%; Williamson with 0.3%
  7. The Economist aggregates polls with a trendline regression of polls rather than a strict average of recent polls.
  8. Gabbard and Steyer with 1.3%; Castro with 0.6%; Bennet with 0.4%; Bullock, Delaney, and Williamson with 0.3%; Messam and Sestak with 0.0%; Patrick not available
  9. Bloomberg with 2.0%; Gabbard with 1.4%; Steyer with 1.0%; Castro with 0.9%; Delaney with 0.5%; Bennet and Bullock with 0.4%; Williamson with 0.3%; Messam and Sestak with 0.0%; Patrick not available

References[change | change source]

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