Nigeria women's national football team

From Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Nigeria
Nickname(s)Super Falcons
AssociationNigeria Football Federation (NFF)
ConfederationCAF (Africa)
Sub-confederationWAFU (West Africa)
Head coachRandy Waldrum[1][2]
CaptainChiamaka Nnadozie
Most capsOnome Ebi (109)
Top scorerPerpetua Nkwocha (80)[3]
FIFA codeNGA
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 39 Decrease 1 (7 December 2018)[4]
Highest23 (July – August 2003; August 2004; March 2005)
Lowest46 (August 2022)
First international
 Nigeria 5–1 Ghana 
(Nigeria; 16 February 1991)
Biggest win
 Nigeria 15–0 Niger 
(Ivory Coast; 11 May 2019)
Biggest defeat
 Norway 8–0 Nigeria 
(Karlstad, Sweden; 6 June 1995)
 Germany 8–0 Nigeria 
(Leverkusen, Germany; 25 November 2010)
 France 8–0 Nigeria 
(Le Mans, France; 6 April 2018)
World Cup
Appearances9 (first in 1991)
Best resultQuarter-finals (1999)
Football at the Summer Olympics
Appearances3 (first in 2000)
Best resultQuarter-finals (2004)
Women's Africa Cup of Nations
Appearances14 (first in 1991)
Best resultChampions (1991, 1995, 1998, 2000, 2002, 2004, 2006, 2010, 2014, 2016, 2018)
WAFU Zone B Women's Cup
Appearances2 (first in 2018)
Best resultChampions (2019)

The Nigeria women's national football team, known as the Super Falcons, plays for Nigeria in women's international football. It's managed by the Nigeria Football Federation (NFF). This team is the most successful women's football team in Africa. They have won the Women's Africa Cup of Nations eleven times. They won their latest title in 2018 by beating South Africa in the final match. This team is also unique because it's the only women's team from the Confederation of African Football that has made it to the quarterfinals in both the FIFA Women's World Cup and the Summer Olympics.

They're also one of the few teams worldwide and the only African team to qualify for every FIFA Women's World Cup. Their best performance was in the 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup when they reached the quarterfinals.


References[change | change source]

  1. "Randy Waldrum is new Super Falcons' Head Coach". thenff.com. thenff. 5 October 2020. Archived from the original on 27 October 2020. Retrieved 16 November 2020.
  2. "OFFICIAL: NFF Announce Randy Waldrum AS New Super Falcons Head Coach". MySportDab. Adedotun. 6 October 2020. Archived from the original on 9 October 2020. Retrieved 6 October 2020.
  3. "AFRICAN LEGEND OF THE WEEK: PERPETUA NKWOCHA". Goal.com. 9 March 2017. Archived from the original on 9 February 2021. Retrieved 28 November 2017.
  4. "The FIFA/Coca-Cola Women's World Ranking". FIFA. 7 December 2018. Retrieved 7 December 2018.