Papyrus Fouad 266

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Fouad Inv.266, which contains the name of God in the Hebrew language יהוה. Fragment of Deuteronomy 31:28 - 32:7

Papyrus Fouad 266 (signed as LXXP. Fouad Inv. 266; Rahlfs 847, 848 and 940; TM nr: 62290; LDAB id: 3451: VH: 0056) is a copy of the Book of Deuteronomy in Koine Greek of the Hebrew Bible known as the Septuagint. It is a papyrus manuscript in roll form. The manuscript has been assigned palaeographically to the 1st century BC (50 BCE). The manuscript has survived in a fragmentary condition. It has been discussed whether if this manuscript is or is not a later recension of the standard Septuagint text.

Description[change | change source]

The Greek text was written on papyrus in uncial letters. The text is written in 33 lines per column. The uncial letters are upright and rounded. Iota adscript occurs.[1]

It is the second oldest known manuscript of the Septuagint and the oldest which used the Hebrew Tetragrammaton in Aramaic "square" or Ashuri script in following places: De 18:5, 5, 7, 15, 16; 19:8, 14; 20:4, 13, 18; 21:1, 8; 23:5; 24:4, 9; 25:15, 16; De 26:2, 7, 8, 14; 27:2, 3, 7, 10, 15; 28:1, 1, 7, 8, 9, 13, 61, 62, 64, 65; 29:4, 10, 20, 29; 30:9, 20; 31:3, 26, 27, 29; 32:3, 6, 19.[2][3][4][5]

References[change | change source]

  1. Metzger, Bruce M. (1991). Manuscripts of the Greek Bible: An Introduction to Palaeography. Oxford: Oxford University Press. p. 60. ISBN 978-0-19-502924-6.
  2. Wadell, W. G. (1944). "The Tetragrammaton in the LXX". 45. Oxford University Press: Journal of Theological Studies: 158–161. {{cite journal}}: Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  3. Studio Patristica, volume I, part I by Kurt Aland and F. L. Cross, Berlino 1957, pp.339-342;
  4. W. Baars Papiro Fouard Inv. N. 266 published by Nederlands Theologisch Tijdschrift, volume XIII, Wageningen, 1959, pp. 442-446
  5. Howard, George. "The Oldest Greek Text of Deuteronomy". Hebrew Union College Annual. Cincinnati 1971: Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion. XLII: 125–131.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: location (link)