Passover

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Passover
Passover
Official name Hebrew: פסח (Pesach)
Observed by Jews, Samaritans, some Christians including Malayali Nasrani Christians, Knanaya and followers of Messianic Judaism.
Type Jewish
Significance

Celebrates the Exodus, the freedom from slavery of the Children of Israel from ancient Egypt that followed the Ten Plagues.

Beginning of the 49 days of Counting of the Omer
Begins 15th day of Nisan[1][2]
Ends 21st day of Nisan in Israel, and among some liberal Diaspora Jews; 22nd day of Nisan outside of Israel among more traditional Diaspora Jews.[3]
2016 date sunset of Friday 22 April to nightfall of Friday 29 April / Saturday 30 April (7th day)
2017 date sunset of Monday 10 April to nightfall of Monday 17 April / Tuesday 18 April (7th day)
2018 date sunset of Friday 30 March to nightfall of Friday 6 April /  Saturday 7 April (7th day)
Celebrations In Jewish practice, one or two festive Seder meals – first two nights; in the times of the Temple in Jerusalem, the Passover sacrifice.
In Samaritan practice, men gather for a religious ceremony on mount Gerizim that includes the ancient lamb sacrifice.
Related to Shavuot ("Festival of Weeks") which follows 49 days from the second night of Passover.

Passover (Hebrew: פסח, Pesach) is a holiday or festival celebrated mostly by Jewish people. They celebrate it to remember when God used Moses to free the Israelites from slavery in Egypt, as told in the book of Exodus in the Bible.[4] God told Moses to set aside this special week originally called "the feast of unleavened bread". During this time, the people eat special foods, do special rituals and sing songs. Passover is around the time of Easter (March/April).

Second Passover[change | change source]

The "Second Passover" (Pesach Sheni) on the 14th of Iyar in the Hebrew Calendar is mentioned in the Hebrew Bible[5] as a make-up day for people who were unable to offer the Passover sacrifice at the appropriate time.

References[change | change source]