Propane

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[4]
Propane
Skeletal formula of propane
Skeletal formula of propane with all implicit carbons shown, and all explicit hydrogens added
Ball and stick model of propane
Spacefill model of propane
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
Propane[1]
Systematic IUPAC name
Tricarbane (never recommended[1])
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
Beilstein Reference 1730718
ChEBI
ChEMBL
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.000.753
EC Number 200-827-9
E number E944 (glazing agents, ...)
Gmelin Reference 25044
KEGG
PubChem {{{value}}}
RTECS number TX2275000
UNII
UN number 1978
SMILES {{{value}}}
Properties[2]
C3H8
Molar mass 44.10 g·mol−1
Appearance Colorless gas
Odor Odorless
Density 2.0098 kg/m3 (at 0 °C, 101.3 kPa)
Melting point −187.7 °C; −305.8 °F; 85.5 K
Boiling point −42.25 to −42.04 °C; −44.05 to −43.67 °F; 230.90 to 231.11 K
47mgL−1 (at 0 °C)
log P 2.236
Vapor pressure 853.16 kPa (at 21.1 °C (70.0 °F))
kH 15 nmol Pa−1 kg−1
Conjugate acid Propanium
-40.5·10−6 cm3/mol
Thermochemistry
Std enthalpy of
formation
ΔfHo298
−105.2–−104.2 kJ mol−1
Std enthalpy of
combustion
ΔcHo298
−2.2197–−2.2187 MJ mol−1
Specific heat capacity, C 73.60 J K−1 mol−1
Hazards
NFPA 704

NFPA 704.svg

4
2
0
 
Explosive limits 2.37–9.5%
U.S. Permissible
exposure limit (PEL)
TWA 1000 ppm (1800 mg/m3)[3]
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

Propane is an organic compound with the chemical formula C
3
H
8
. It is an alkane with three carbon atoms. It is used in fuels.

It begins to burn very quickly. Its melting temperature is −187.7 °C; its boiling temperature is −42 °C; its density is 1.83 g/l.

Propane is extracted from natural gasoline or from petroleum.

Sources[change | change source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 "Front Matter". Nomenclature of Organic Chemistry : IUPAC Recommendations and Preferred Names 2013 (Blue Book). Cambridge: The Royal Society of Chemistry. 2014. p. 4. doi:10.1039/9781849733069-FP001. ISBN 978-0-85404-182-4. Similarly, the retained names ‘ethane’, ‘propane’, and ‘butane’ were never replaced by systematic names ‘dicarbane’, ‘tricarbane’, and ‘tetracarbane’ as recommended for analogues of silane, ‘disilane’; phosphane, ‘triphosphane’; and sulfane, ‘tetrasulfane’.
  2. Record of Propane in the GESTIS Substance Database of the Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
  3. "NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards #0524". National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).
  4. GOV, NOAA Office of Response and Restoration, US. "PROPANE - CAMEO Chemicals - NOAA". cameochemicals.noaa.gov.