Rhesus macaque

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Macaque at the Red Fort of Agra
A Project Mercury rocket, launched in 1960, took this rhesus into space

The rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta), often called the rhesus monkey, is one of the best known species of Old World monkeys.

It lives in a wide area, and has an unknown but quite large population. It lives in a broad range of habitats. Native to South, Central and Southeast Asia, troops of Macaca mulatta inhabit a great variety of habitats from grasslands to arid and forested areas, but also close to human settlements.[1]

Rhesus macaques are native to northern India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Nepal, Burma, Thailand, Afghanistan, Vietnam, southern China, and some neighboring areas. They have the widest geographic ranges of any nonhuman primate.

They are regular swimmers. Babies as young as a few days old can swim, and adults are known to swim over a half mile between islands. Rhesus macaques are noted for their tendency to move from rural to urban areas, where they rely on handouts or refuse from humans.[2]

References[change | change source]

  1. Timmins R.J.; et al. (2008). "Macaca mulatta". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2010.4. International Union for Conservation of Nature. 
  2. Ciani A.C. (1986). Intertroop agonistic behavior of a feral rhesus macaque troop ranging in town and forest areas in India (PDF). Aggressive Behavior 12: 433−439.