Rusyn language

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Rusyn
русиньскый язык; руски язик
rusîn'skyj jazyk; ruski jazik
EthnicityRusyns
Native speakers
623,500 (2000–2006)[1]
Census population: 70,000. These are numbers from national official bureaus for statistics:

Slovakia – 33,482[2]
Serbia – 15,626[3]
Ukraine – 6,725[4]
Poland – 10,000[5]
Croatia – 2,337[6]
Hungary – 1,113[7]

Czech Republic – 777[8]
Cyrillic script (Rusyn alphabets)
Latin script (Slovakia)[9]
Official status
Recognised minority
language in
Language codes
ISO 639-3rue
Glottologrusy1239[13]
Linguasphere53-AAA-ec < 53-AAA-e
(varieties: 53-AAA-eca to 53-AAA-ecc)
Idioma rusino.PNG
This article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode characters. For a guide to IPA symbols, see Help:IPA.

Rusyn (Rusyn: русиньска бесїда or русиньскый язык) is an East Slavic language. It is spoken by the Rusyns of Central Europe. In English, it is also called Ruthene or Ruthenian. Some linguists treat it as a distinct language.[14] Some Ukrainian scholars think it is a dialect of Ukrainian.[15]

Rusyn is spoken in the Transcarpathian Region of Ukraine, in northeastern Slovakia, in Vojvodina, in southeastern Poland, in Hungary and in northern Romania.

In Serbia, Rusyn is an official minority language.[16] Since 1995, Rusyn has been an official minority language in Slovakia. In some Slovak municipalities, it is an official language.[17]

Rusyn is listed as a protected language by the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages in Slovakia, Serbia, Croatia and Romania.

References[change | change source]

  1. Rusyn at Ethnologue (18th ed., 2015)
  2. Statistical Office of the Slovak Republic. "Population and Housing Census 2011: Table 11. Resident population by nationality – 2011, 2001, 1991" (PDF). Statistical Office of the Slovak Republic. Retrieved 22 March 2012.
  3. Republic of Serbia, Republic Statistical Office (24 December 2002). "Final results of the census 2002" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 6 March 2009. Retrieved 16 December 2010.
  4. State Statistics Committee of Ukraine. "About number and composition population of UKRAINE by data All-Ukrainian population census 2001 data". Archived from the original on 2 March 2008. Retrieved 16 December 2010.
  5. "Home" (PDF). Central Statistical Office of Poland. Archived from the original (PDF) on 16 January 2013. Retrieved 22 March 2012.
  6. "Republic of Croatia – Central Bureau of Statistics". Crostat. Retrieved 5 September 2010.
  7. "1.28 Population by mother tongue, nationality and sex, 1900–2001". Hungarian Central Statistical Office. 2001. Retrieved 28 February 2012.
  8. "Obyvatelstvo podle věku, mateřského jazyka a pohlaví". Retrieved 2 November 2012.
  9. Rusyn at Ethnologue (21st ed., 2018)
  10. "Implementation of the Charter in Hungary". Database for the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages. Public Foundation for European Comparative Minority Research. Archived from the original on 27 February 2014. Retrieved 16 June 2014.
  11. "The Statue of the Autonomous Province of Vojvodina, Serbia". Skupstinavojvodine.gov.rs. Retrieved 2012-08-07.
  12. "Law of Ukraine "On Principles of State Language Policy" (Current version — Revision from 1 February 2014)". Document 5029-17, Article 7: Regional or minority languages Ukraine, Paragraph 2. Zakon2.rada.gov.ua. 1 February 2014. Archived from the original on 14 February 2014. Retrieved 30 April 2014.
  13. Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Rusyn". Glottolog 3.0. Jena, Germany: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History.
  14. Bernard Comrie, "Slavic Languages," International Encyclopedia of Linguistics (1992, Oxford, Vol 3, pp. 452-456.
    Ethnologue, 16th edition
  15. George Y. Shevelov, "Ukrainian," The Slavonic Languages (1993, Routledge, pp. 947-998.
  16. "Statute of the Autonomous Province of Vojvodina". Skupstinavojvodine.gov.rs. Retrieved 2012-08-07.
  17. Slovenskej Republiky, Národná Rada (1999). "Zákon 184/1999 Z. z. o používaní jazykov národnostných menšín" (in Slovak). Zbierka zákonov. Retrieved 2010-05-18.

Other websites[change | change source]