Shlomo Argov

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Shlomo Argov
Born14 December 1929
Died23 February 2003 (aged 73)
OccupationDiplomat
Spouse(s)Hava
ChildrenGideon, Yehudit and Edna

Shlomo Argov, Hebrew: שלמה ארגוב , (December 14, 1929 – February 23, 2003) was a well-known Israeli diplomat. He was the Israeli ambassador to the United Kingdom. On 3 June 82 three Palestinians tried to kill Shlomo Argov. This was a cause of the 1982 Lebanon War.

Early life and education[change | change source]

Argov was born in Jerusalem in 1929. His family had lived in Jerusalem for seven generations. As a teenager, he joined the Palmach, the elite force of the Haganah. During the 1947-1948 Civil War in Mandatory Palestine, he was wounded in the Battle of Safed. When Israel was established and the 1948 Arab-Israeli War began, Argov joined the Israel Defense Forces (IDF).[1]

In 1950, he completed his military service and went to the United States to study. In 1952 he received a Bachelor of Arts in political science from Georgetown University. While studying, he worked part-time at the Israeli Embassy. In this time he met his future wife Hava. Afterwards, he went to study in the United Kingdom. In 1955 he received a Master of Arts in international relations from the London School of Economics.

Personal life[change | change source]

Argov had three children with his wife Hava: son Gideon and daughters Yehudit and Edna. Hava died in May 2002.[1]

Attempted assassination[change | change source]

On 3 June 1982, three men, Hussein Ghassan Said, Marwan al-Banna, and Nawaf al-Rosan came close to Argov when he got into his car after a party at the Dorchester Hotel, in Park Lane, London.[2] There is another report that says that four men were coming close to Shlomo Argov.[3] Said shot Argov in the head. Argov was not killed, but he was badly injured.[3] He was taken to the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery very rapidly, and he was taken to a specialist unit and the surgeons did an emergency brain surgery on him . He remained in a coma for three months. Argov was the second of two Israeli diplomats who were attacked in just a month. This was given as the reason for Israel attacking Lebanon in 1982.[4]

Later life[change | change source]

Argov recovered from his coma and was returned to Israel. There, he was placed in Hadassah Hospital in Jerusalem as a permanent patient.[2][5] Though he could not move, he could clearly understand what was going on around him.[6]

Death[change | change source]

Argov died at Hadassah Hospital in 2003 aged 73 from the injuries in the attack.[2] He had been paralysed and was placed in permanent hospital care for 21 years.

References[change | change source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 "Shlomo Argov". MFA. Retrieved 2013-01-16.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Joffe, Lawrence (25 February 2003). "Obituary: Shlomo Argov". guardian.co.uk. London. Retrieved 3 June 2010.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Sam Katz (25 July 1985). Armies in Lebanon 1982–84. Osprey Publishing. p. 3. ISBN 978-0-85045-602-8. Retrieved 16 January 2013.
  4. Avigdor Kahalani, A Warrior's Way (New York: S.P.I. Books, 1994), pp. 300–301
  5. Paul Lashmar and Shraga Elam (19 June 1999). "MI5 was feuding with Mossad while known terrorists struck in London". The Independent. Retrieved 2013-01-16.
  6. "Shlomo Argov". The Telegraph. 24 February 2003. Retrieved 2013-01-16.