Shogo Kamo

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Shogo Kamo
Personal information
Full name Shogo Kamo
Date of birth (1915-12-12)December 12, 1915
Place of birth Hamamatsu, Shizuoka, Japan
Date of death September 14, 1977(1977-09-14) (aged 61)
Place of death Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan
Height 1.72 m (5 ft 7+12 in)
Position(s) Forward
Youth career
Hamamatsu Daiichi High School
Waseda University
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
Waseda WMW
National team
1936 Japan 2 (0)
Honours
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only

Shogo Kamo (加茂 正五, Kamo Shogo, December 12, 1915 – September 14, 1977) was a Japanese football player. He played for the Japan national team. His brother Takeshi Kamo also played for Japan national team.

Biography[change | change source]

Kamo was born in Hamamatsu on December 12, 1915.[1] He played for Waseda University. He won 1938 Emperor's Cup with Sei Fuwa, Sekiji Sasano, Kunitaka Sueoka, Hidetoki Takahashi and so on. After graduating from university, he played for Waseda WMW which was consisted of his alma mater Waseda University players and graduates.

In 1936, when Kamo was a Waseda University student, he was selected the Japan national team for 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin. At this competition, on August 4, he debuted against Sweden. He assisted Taizo Kawamoto and Tokutaro Ukon goals, and Japan completed a come-from-behind victory. The first victory in Olympics for the Japan and the historic victory over one of the powerhouses became later known as "Miracle of Berlin" (ベルリンの奇跡) in Japan. In 2016, this team was selected Japan Football Hall of Fame. On August 7, he also played against Italy. He played 2 games for Japan in 1936. His older brother Takeshi Kamo was also an Olympic footballer for Japan.

On September 14, 1977, Kamo collapsed during training for exhibition match at National Stadium in Shinjuku, Tokyo. He died of myocardial infarction on the day at hospital at the age of 61.

Statistics[change | change source]

[2]

Japan national team
YearAppsGoals
1936 2 0
Total 2 0

References[change | change source]

Other websites[change | change source]