Sucrose

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Sucrose

Sucrose
Sucrose

General
Systematic name Sucrose
Other names Sugar, Saccharose
atomic formula C12H22O11
SMILES OC1C(OC(CO)C(O)C1O)
OC2(CO)OC(CO)C(O)C2O
Molar mass 342.29648 g/mol
Appearance white solid
CAS number [57-50-01]
Chemical Properties
Density and phase 1.587 g/cm³, solid
Solubility in water 211.5 g/100 ml (25°C)
Melting point 186°C (459.15 K)
Boiling point decomposition
Chiral rotation [α]D +66.47°
Refractive index 1.5376
Structure
Molecular shape ?
Crystal structure monoclinic hemihedral
Dipole moment ? D
Hazards
MSDS External MSDS
Main hazards Combustible
NFPA 704

NFPA 704.svg

1
1
0
 
Flash point N/A
R/S statement R: ?
S: ?
RTECS number WN6500000
Supplementary data page
Structure and
properties
n, εr, etc.
Thermodynamic
data
Phase behaviour
Solid, liquid, gas
Spectral data UV, IR, NMR, MS
Related compounds
Other anions ?
Other cations ?
Except where noted otherwise, data are given for
materials in their standard state (at 25°C, 100 kPa)
Infobox disclaimer and references
Solubility of Pure Sucrose
Temperature(C) g sucrose/g water
50 2.59
55 2.73
60 2.89
65 3.06
70 3.25
75 3.46
80 3.69
85 3.94
90 4.20

Sucrose (common name: table sugar, also called saccharose) is a disaccharide (glucose + fructose) with the molecular formula C12H22O11. Its systematic name is α-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-D-fructofuranose. It is best known for its role in human nutrition and is formed by plants but not by higher organisms.

Physical and chemical properties[change | change source]

Pure sucrose is most often prepared as a fine, white, odorless crystalline powder with a pleasing, sweet taste.

References[change | change source]

Yudkin, J. (1973). Sugar - Chemical, Biological and Nutritional Aspects of Sucrose. The Butterworth Group. ISBN 0-408-70172-2.  Unknown parameter |coauthors= ignored (|author= suggested) (help)

Other websites[change | change source]