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The Mickey Mouse Club

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The Mickey Mouse Club
Also known as The New Mickey Mouse Club (1977–1979)
The All-New Mickey Mouse Club (1989–1996)
MMC (1993–1989)
Club Mickey Mouse (2017–)
Created by Walt Disney
Hal Adelquist
Presented by

Fred Newman (1989 revival, seasons 1-6)

Mowava Pryor (1989 revival, seasons 1-3)
Theme music composer Jimmie Dodd
Country of origin United States
No. of seasons 14
No. of episodes 360
Production
Producer(s) Bill Walsh (1955–1958)
Running time 22-44 minutes
Production company(s) Walt Disney Productions
Distributor Sandy Frank Media
Disney–ABC Domestic Television
Release
Original network United States: ABC (1955–1959)
Syndication (1977–1979)
The Disney Channel (1989–1996)
Canada: Family Channel (1989–1996)
Original release October 3, 1955 (1955-10-03) – March 7, 1996 (1996-03-07)
External links
Website movies.disney.com/the-mickey-mouse-club
1956 cast photo. Front row; L–R: Annette Funicello, Karen Pendleton, Cubby O'Brien, Sherry Alberoni, Dennis Day. Row two: Charley Laney, Sharon Baird, Darlene Gillespie, Jay-Jay Solari. Row three: Tommy Cole, Cheryl Holdridge, Larry Larsen, Eileen Diamond. Row four: Lonnie Burr, Margene Storey, Doreen Tracey. Back row: Jimmie Dodd, Bobby Burgess.

The Mickey Mouse Club was an American variety television series that began in 1955, ran intermittently, and left the air in 1996. It was directed by Walt Disney Productions.

Over the years, the series featured many stellar teenage performers including Annette Funicello, Britney Spears, and Justin Timberlake. The original series ran newsreels, cartoons, talent segments, and Disney produced serials such as The Hardy Boys with Tommy Kirk and Tim Considine.

Mickey Mouse Club was hosted by Jimmie Dodd, a songwriter and the Head Mouseketeer. He provided leadership both on and off screen. In addition to his other contributions, he often provided short segments encouraging young viewers to make the right moral choices. These little sermons became known as "Doddisms".[1]

Related pages[change | change source]

References[change | change source]

  1. Cotter, Jim. (1997). The Wonderful World of Disney Television. New York: Hyperion Books. pp. 181–196 (1950s), 197–198 (1970s), 295 (MMC). ISBN 0-7868-6359-5