Thief II: The Metal Age

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Thief II: The Metal Age
Developer(s)Looking Glass Studios
Publisher(s)Eidos Interactive
Director(s)Steve Pearsall
Designer(s)Tim Stellmach
Programmer(s)Alex Duran
William Farquhar
Pat McElhatton
Artist(s)Mark Lizotte
Composer(s)Eric Brosius
SeriesThief
EngineDark Engine
Platform(s)Microsoft Windows
Release
  • NA: February 29, 2000
  • EU: 2000
Genre(s)Stealth
Mode(s)Single-player

Thief II: The Metal Age is a 2000 stealth video game developed by Looking Glass Studios and published by Eidos Interactive. Like its predecessor Thief: The Dark Project, the game follows Garrett, a master thief who works in and around a steampunk metropolis called the City. The player assumes the role of Garrett as he unravels a conspiracy related to a new religious sect. Garrett takes on missions such as burglaries and frameups, while trying to avoid detection by guards and automated security.

Thief II received positive reviews from critics, and its initial sales were stronger than those of its predecessor. However, the game's royalties were gained slowly, which made Looking Glass's financial troubles worse. As a result, the company closed in May 2000, with plans for Thief III cancelled. The third game in the series, entitled Thief: Deadly Shadows, was developed by Ion Storm and published by Eidos in 2004. Thief 2X: Shadows of the Metal Age, a widely praised expansion mod for Thief II, was released in 2005. In 2014, Square Enix published a reboot of the series, developed by Eidos Montréal.

Gameplay[change | change source]

Thief II is a stealth game that takes place from a first-person perspective in a three-dimensional (3D) graphical environment.[1] The player seeks to complete mission objectives and to evade the notice of opponents such as guards. The player must minimize the visibility and audibility of the player character, Garrett, to escape detection. Players try to avoid lit areas and loud flooring in favor of shadows and quiet flooring. A light monitor on the heads-up display (HUD) indicates the player character's visibility.[2] While it is possible for the player character to engage in direct combat, he is easily defeated.

Reception[change | change source]

 Reception
Review scores
Publication Score
GameFan 95 out of 100[3]
GamePro 4 out of 5[4]
PC Gamer US 89%[5]
PC Zone 82%[6]
Computer Games Magazine 4.5/5 stars[7]
Aggregate scores
Aggregator Score
Game Rankings 89.14%[9]
Metacritic 87[8]

Thief 2 debuted high on the bestsellers list for computer games, and its initial sales were better than those of its commercially successful predecessor. By November 2000, its global sales had surpassed 220,000 copies; PC Zone described these figures as "commercial acclaim."[10] The United States alone accounted for 67,084 sales by the end of 2000, which drew in revenues of $2.37 million.[11] The game later received a "Silver" sales award by the Entertainment and Leisure Software Publishers Association (ELSPA),[12] indicating sales of at least 100,000 copies in the United Kingdom.[13] Thief II also received positive reviews from critics, with an aggregate score of 87 on Metacritic and 89.14% on GameRankings.

References[change | change source]

  1. L. McDonald, Thomas (May 9, 2000). "Stealing Beauty". Computer Gaming World. Archived from the original on February 11, 2001.
  2. Hart, Dorian (2000). Thief II: The Metal Age manual. Eidos Interactive. pp. 5, 9, 11, 12, 17, 18, 20, 26, 27, 30, 34.
  3. Torres, Jasen (April 4, 2000). "Thief 2: The Metal Age". GameFan. Archived from the original on June 6, 2000. Retrieved November 14, 2010.
  4. Brenesal, Barry (April 21, 2000). "Thief II: The Metal Age". GamePro. Archived from the original on February 12, 2005.
  5. Preston, Jim (August 2000). "Thief II: The Metal Age". PC Gamer US. Archived from the original on December 28, 2001.
  6. Presley, Paul (April 2000). "Thief II: The Metal Age". PC Zone (88): 68–71. 
  7. E. Sones, Benjamin (April 4, 2000). "Thief 2: The Metal Age". Computer Games Strategy Plus. Archived from the original on May 17, 2003.
  8. "THIEF II: THE METAL AGE". Metacritic. Retrieved January 24, 2018.
  9. "Thief II: The Metal Age for PC". GameRankings. Retrieved June 26, 2013.
  10. Staff (November 2000). "Ion Storm Steals Thief". PC Zone (95): 23. 
  11. "It's All in the Numbers". PC Gamer (Future US) 8 (4): 40, 41. April 2000. 
  12. "ELSPA Sales Awards: Silver". Entertainment and Leisure Software Publishers Association. Archived from the original on February 21, 2009.
  13. Caoili, Eric (November 26, 2008). "ELSPA: Wii Fit, Mario Kart Reach Diamond Status In UK". Gamasutra. Archived from the original on September 18, 2017.

Other websites[change | change source]