Zhou Enlai

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
This is a Chinese name; the family name is Zhou.
Zhou Enlai
周恩来
Zhou Enlai in 1940s(color).jpg
3rd First Vice Chairman of the Communist Party of China
In office
30 August 1973 – 8 January 1976
Chairman Mao Zedong
Preceded by Lin Biao (1971)
Succeeded by Hua Guofeng
Vice Chairman of the Communist Party of China
In office
28 September 1956 – 1 August 1966
Chairman Mao Zedong
1st Premier of the People's Republic of China
In office
1 October 1949 – 8 January 1976
President Mao Zedong (until 1959)
Liu Shaoqi (until 1968)
vacant and abolished
Leader Mao Zedong (Chairman of the Communist Party of China)
1st vice-premier Dong Biwu
Chen Yun
Lin Biao
Deng Xiaoping
Succeeded by Hua Guofeng
1st Foreign Minister of the People's Republic of China
In office
1 October 1949 – 11 February 1958
Premier Himself
Preceded by None
Succeeded by Chen Yi
Personal details
Born (1898-03-05)5 March 1898
Huai'an, Jiangsu, Qing China
Died 8 January 1976(1976-01-08) (aged 77)
Beijing, People's Republic of China
Political party Communist Party of China
Spouse(s)
Deng Yingchao (m. 1925–1976)
Children Sun Weishi, Wang Shu (both adopted)
Alma mater Nankai University
Occupation Politician
Strategist
Revolutionary
Diplomat
Signature
Military service
Battles/wars

Zhou Enlai (pinyin: Zhōu Ēnlái; 5 March 1898 – 8 January 1976) was the first Premier of the People's Republic of China. He served from October 1949 until his death in January 1976. Zhou served under Mao Zedong and was an important leader in the Communist Party.

A skilled and able diplomat, Zhou served as the Chinese foreign minister from 1949 to 1958. He believed in getting along with Western countries after the Korean War. He participated in the 1954 Geneva Conference and helped organize Richard Nixon's 1972 visit to China. He helped make policies regarding the disagreements with the U.S., Taiwan, the Soviet Union (after 1960), India and Vietnam. Zhou is best known as the long-time top aide to Mao Zedong. His specialty was foreign policy. Mao and Zhou's different personalities made them an effective team, according to Henry Kissinger, the American diplomat who dealt with both men.