Daily Mail

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The Daily Mail is a large, well-known newspaper. It is printed in Britain, and started in 1896. It is published every weekday and Saturday from a factory in London, England. It is not printed on Sundays. Its sister paper, the Mail on Sunday, is printed instead.

It is the second-most sold newspaper in Britain – it sells more than a million copies a day. Its political opinion is right-wing, and it supports the Conservative Party in elections. The newspaper is available in many countries outside Britain, such as Egypt and the US. There is a different Scottish edition of the newspaper, which is sold in Scotland only and differs mainly in the Sport pages. There is also an Irish version of the newspaper, but the main international version is the English one.

It is the principal publication of the Daily Mail and General Trust, but the company also prints the Evening Standard, London Lite and Metro newspapers in the UK.

People often argue about The Daily Mail, because a lot of people think it's racist and sexist.[1]

The Daily Mail was first published by Lord Northcliffe in 1896. It started as a broadsheet. It is now a tabloid.

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