House of Lords

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The House of Lords is one of the two Houses of Parliament of the United Kingdom (UK). It is in London, the capital city of the UK. The other house is the House of Commons. Together the two houses form the government and parliament of the UK.

The House of Lords is not elected (voted for),

  • 2 people are members because of their job (The Duke of Norfolk, who is the Earl Marshal, and the Marquess of Cholmondely, the Lord Chamberlain, who both help to organise royal events).
  • 90 people are Hereditary Peers members of the House of Lords because one of their ancestors was made a member.
  • The other members were made members for life, either Life Peers, who have existed since 1958 or as Law Lords. Law lords were senior judges made members of the House to help when the House of Lords was also the Supreme Court in England and Wales.
  • The twenty-six most senior Bishops of the Church of England also sit in the House of Lords, they are called the Lords Spiritual.

Crossbenchers[change | change source]

Many members of the House of Lords sit as Crossbenchers. This means they do not support either the government or opposition parties, but instead are independent of party politics. They got their name because the benches where they sit are placed across the aisle which separates the government and opposition supporters.

See[change | change source]