House of Commons of the United Kingdom

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The term House of Commons is used by many countries to describe part of their parliament. In the United Kingdom, the House of Commons is the part of the parliament which has the most power. It is made up of Members of Parliament elected by the people. Sometimes it is called the 'lower house'. (The 'upper house' is called the House of Lords.) Other countries also have parts of parliament called the House of Commons which work in the same way.

In the British parliament, there are 650 Members of Parliament or MPs. Each MP represents a constituency, which covers an area of the country. The people of each constituency vote at a general election or a by-election to choose one person to represent them in the House of Commons. Usually, the people choose someone who belongs to a political party. When all the parties get together, the party which has the most members is the government and runs the country. The leader of that party is called the Prime Minister.

The House of Commons hold their meetings in the Palace of Westminster. Their chief officer is the Speaker of the House elected by MPs. The Clerk of the House of Commons is the Principal Advisor of the Speaker and is in charge of the security.