Columbus, Kansas

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Columbus, Kansas
Motto(s): 
"Help America Discover Columbus..."[1]
Location within Cherokee County and Kansas
Location within Cherokee County and Kansas
KDOT map of Cherokee County (legend)
Coordinates: 37°10′17″N 94°50′27″W / 37.17139°N 94.84083°W / 37.17139; -94.84083Coordinates: 37°10′17″N 94°50′27″W / 37.17139°N 94.84083°W / 37.17139; -94.84083
CountryUnited States
StateKansas
CountyCherokee
Founded1868
Incorporated1871
Named forColumbus, Ohio
Area
 • Total2.42 sq mi (6.27 km2)
 • Land2.42 sq mi (6.27 km2)
 • Water0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation
912 ft (278 m)
Population
 • Total3,312
 • Estimate 
(2016)[4]
3,104
 • Density1,400/sq mi (530/km2)
Time zoneUTC-6 (CST)
 • Summer (DST)UTC-5 (CDT)
ZIP code
66725
Area code620
FIPS code20-15075
GNIS ID0469479 [5]
Websitecolumbuscityhall.com

Columbus is the second biggest city Cherokee County, Kansas, United States. It is about 15 miles south-southwest of Pittsburg. It is also the county seat of Cherokee County. In 2010, 3,312 people lived there.[6]

History[change | change source]

The first settlement at Columbus was created in 1868.[7] The first post office in Columbus was created in 1869.[8]

Columbus was a railroad junction for the Saint Louis and San Francisco, and the Missouri, Kansas, and Texas railroads. It was named Columbus by A.L. Peters, one of the European-American creators of the city. It was named after his hometown of Columbus, Ohio; the name is indirectly named after Christopher Columbus, the explorer.[9][10] Coal, lead and zinc were found in the area. Columbus had a big trade in agricultural products. Its businesses had machine shops, grain elevators, flour mills, a cigar factory, bottle works (soft drinks), a canning factory, and a big brick-making factory.[11]

In 1875, Robert A. Long and Victor Bell created the Long-Bell Lumber Company in Columbus. From one lumberyard, Long-Bell grew their businesses and holdings to become one of the biggest vertically integrated lumber companies in the United States. In 1956, it was bought by International Paper.[12]

Geography[change | change source]

Columbus is at 37°10′17″N 94°50′27″W / 37.17139°N 94.84083°W / 37.17139; -94.84083 (37.171379, -94.840704).[13] The United States Census Bureau says that the city has a total area of 2.42 square miles (6.27 km2). All of it is land.[2]

Weather[change | change source]

Columbus has hot, humid summers and generally mild to cool winters. The Köppen Climate Classification system says that Columbus has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps.[14]

People[change | change source]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1870402
18801,164189.6%
18902,16085.6%
19002,3106.9%
19103,06432.6%
19203,1553.0%
19303,2352.5%
19403,4025.2%
19503,4902.6%
19603,395−2.7%
19703,356−1.1%
19803,4262.1%
19903,268−4.6%
20003,3963.9%
20103,312−2.5%
2016 (est.)3,104[4]−6.3%
U.S. Decennial Census[15]
2012 Estimate[16]

2010 census[change | change source]

The 2010 census says that there were 3,312 people, 1,424 households, and 850 families living in Columbus.[3]

Famous people[change | change source]

References[change | change source]

  1. "Columbus Chamber of Commerce". Columbus Chamber of Commerce. Archived from the original on July 22, 2012. Retrieved August 17, 2012.
  2. 2.0 2.1 "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2012-07-02. Retrieved 2012-07-06.
  3. 3.0 3.1 "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-06.
  4. 4.0 4.1 "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  5. "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  6. "2010 City Population and Housing Occupancy Status". U.S. Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 21, 2011. Retrieved March 6, 2011.
  7. Blackmar, Frank Wilson (1912). Kansas: A Cyclopedia of State History, Embracing Events, Institutions, Industries, Counties, Cities, Towns, Prominent Persons, Etc. Standard Publishing Company. p. 391.
  8. "Kansas Post Offices, 1828-1961 (archived)". Kansas Historical Society. Archived from the original on October 9, 2013. Retrieved 6 June 2014.
  9. John Rydjord, Kansas Place-Names, University of Oklahoma Press, 1972, ISBN 0-8061-0994-7
  10. The Modern Light, Columbus, August 16, 1951
  11. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2009-07-02. Retrieved 2009-03-28.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  12. William E. Connelley, A Standard History of Kansas and Kansans,, Chicago: Lewis Publishing Company, 1918
  13. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  14. Climate Summary for Columbus, Kansas
  15. United States Census Bureau. "Census of Population and Housing". Archived from the original on April 26, 2015. Retrieved February 15, 2014.
  16. "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". Archived from the original on November 20, 2013. Retrieved February 15, 2014.

Other websites[change | change source]

City
Schools
Historical
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