Cortisone

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Cortisone
Names
IUPAC name
(8S,9S,10R,13S,14S,17R)-17-Hydroxy-17-(2-hydroxyacetyl)-10,13-dimethyl-1,2,6,7,8,9,12,14,15,16-decahydrocyclopenta[a]phenanthrene-3,11-dione
Other names
17α,21-Dihydroxypregn-4-ene-3,11,20-trione; 17α,21-Dihydroxy-11-ketoprogesterone; 17α-Hydroxy-11-dehydrocorticosterone
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChEBI
ChEMBL
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.000.149
KEGG
MeSH {{{value}}}
PubChem {{{value}}}
SMILES {{{value}}}
Properties
C21H28O5
Molar mass 360.45 g·mol−1
Melting point 220 to 224 °C (428 to 435 °F; 493 to 497 K)
Pharmacology
H02AB10 (WHO) S01BA03 (WHO)
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

Cortisone is a 21-carbon steroid hormone. Its chemical name is 17-hydroxy-11-dehydrocorticosterone. It is one of the main hormones released by the adrenal gland in response to stress.

In chemical structure, it is closely related to cortisol. It is used to treat a variety of ailments and can be administered in various ways. Cortisone suppresses the immune system. This reduces inflammation, pain and swelling at the site of the injury. Long-term use of cortisone has risks.[1][2]

Tadeus Reichstein, E.C. Kendall and P.S. Hench were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1950 for their discovery of cortisone.

References[change | change source]

  1. "Cortisone shots". MayoClinic.com. 2010-11-16. Retrieved July 31, 2013.
  2. "Prednisone and other corticosteroids: Balance the risks and benefits". MayoClinic.com. 2010-06-05. Retrieved 2011-09-03.