FC Dallas

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FC Dallas
Nickname(s)
  • The Toros
  • The Hoops
  • Burn
FoundedJune 6, 1995; 27 years ago (1995-06-06)
as Dallas Burn
StadiumToyota Stadium
Frisco, Texas
Capacity20,500
OwnerClark Hunt and Dan Hunt
Head coachNico Estévez
LeagueMajor League Soccer
2021Western Conference: 11th
Overall: 23rd
Playoffs: Did not qualify
WebsiteClub website
Primarycolors
Secondary colors
Current season

FC Dallas is an American soccer team. They play in Major League Soccer (MLS) in Frisco, Texas, a suburb of Dallas, Texas. The team is a founding member of the MLS. Before 2005, they were known as the Dallas Burn. The team is owned by the Hunt Sports Group, which also owns the National Football League team Kansas City Chiefs.

Players and staff[change | change source]

Roster[change | change source]

As of June 29, 2022[1]
No. Position Player Nation
1 Goalkeeper Jimmy Maurer      United States
2 Defender Eddie Munjoma (HG)     United States
3 Defender José Martínez      Spain
4 Defender Marco Farfan      United States
5 Midfielder Facundo Quignón      Argentina
6 Midfielder Edwin Cerrillo (HG)     United States
7 Midfielder Paul Arriola      United States
8 Midfielder Jáder Obrian      Colombia
10 Forward Jesús Ferreira (HG;DP)     United States
11 Forward Szabolcs Schön      Hungary
13 Goalkeeper Antonio Carrera (HG)     United States
14 Forward Beni Redžić (HG)     Bosnia and Herzegovina
15 Forward Isaiah Parker (GA)     United States
16 Forward Tsiki Ntsabeleng      South Africa
17 Defender Nkosi Tafari      United States
18 Midfielder Brandon Servania (HG)     United States
19 Midfielder Paxton Pomykal (HG)     United States
20 Forward Alan Velasco (DP)     Argentina
21 Midfielder Kalil ElMedKhar      United States
22 Midfielder Ema Twumasi      Ghana
23 Midfielder Thomas Roberts (HG)     United States
24 Defender Matt Hedges      United States
25 Defender Collin Smith (HG)     United States
26 Defender Lucas Bartlett      United States
28 Defender Joshué Quiñónez (on loan from Barcelona SC)     Ecuador
29 Forward Franco Jara (DP)     Argentina
30 Goalkeeper Maarten Paes      Netherlands
31 Defender Nanu (on loan from Porto)     Guinea-Bissau

Out on loan[change | change source]

No. Position Player Nation
32 Defender Justin Che (at TSG 1899 Hoffenheim)     United States
80 Midfielder Nicky Hernandez (at San Antonio FC)     United States
Forward Dante Sealy (at PSV Eindhoven)     United States

Team management[change | change source]

Coaching staff
Head coach Nico Estévez
Assistant coach Peter Luccin
Assistant coach Javier Cabello
Assistant coach Ben Cross
Goalkeeper coach Drew Keeshan
Head of performance Miguel Villagrasa
Technical director Andre Zanotta
Director of methodology Marco Ferruzzi

Head coaches[change | change source]

Name Nation Tenure
Dave Dir  United States 1996–2000
Mike Jeffries  United States January 23, 2001 – September 15, 2003
Colin Clarke  Northern Ireland {September 15, 2003 – December 4, 2003} (interim)
December 4, 2003 – November 7, 2006
Steve Morrow  Northern Ireland {November 7, 2006 – December 11, 2006} (interim)
December 11, 2006 – May 20, 2008
Marco Ferruzzi  United States May 20, 2008 – June 16, 2008 (interim)
September 19, 2021 – December 2, 2021 (interim)
Schellas Hyndman  United States June 16, 2008 – October 18, 2013
Óscar Pareja  Colombia January 10, 2014 – November 16, 2018
Luchi Gonzalez  United States December 16, 2018 – September 19, 2021
Nico Estévez  Spain December 2, 2021 – present

Record[change | change source]

Year-by-year[change | change source]

Year Regular Season Playoffs U.S. Open Cup CONCACAF
Champions' League
Avg. Attendance
(Regular Season)
Avg. Attendance
(Playoffs)
Dallas Burn
1996 2nd, West (17–15) Conference Semifinals Semifinals did not qualify 16,011 9,963
1997 3rd, West (16–16) Conference Finals Champions 9,678 9,312
1998 4th, West (15–17) Conference Semifinals Semifinals 10,948 8,130
1999 2nd, West (19–13) Conference Finals Quarterfinals 12,211 10,988
2000 3rd, Central (14–14–4) Conference Semifinals Quarterfinals 13,102 7,555
2001 3rd, Central (10–11–5) Conference Semifinals Round of 32 Not held 12,574 17,149
2002 3rd, West (12–9–7) Conference Semifinals Semifinals did not qualify 13,122 7,184
2003 5th, West (6–19–5) did not qualify Round of 16 7,906 did not qualify
2004 5th, West (10–14–6) did not qualify Quarterfinals 9,088 did not qualify
FC Dallas
2005 2nd, West (13–10–9) Conference Semifinals Final did not qualify 11,189 10,104
2006 1st, West (16–12–4) Conference Semifinals Quarterfinals 14,982 15,486
2007 3rd, West (13–12–5) Conference Semifinals Final 15,145 12,537
2008 5th, West (8–10–12) did not qualify Quarterfinals 13,024 did not qualify
2009 7th, West (11–13–6) did not qualify did not qualify 12,441 did not qualify
2010 3rd, West (12–4–14) MLS Cup Final did not qualify 10,815 11,003
2011 4th, West (15–12–7) Knockout Round Semifinals Group stage 12,861 10,017
2012 6th, West (9–13–12) did not qualify 3rd round did not qualify 14,199 did not qualify
2013 8th, West (11–12–11) did not qualify Quarterfinals 15,374 did not qualify
2014 4th, West (16–12–6) Conference Semifinals Semifinals 16,816 13,196
2015 1st, West (18–10–6) Conference Finals Round of 16 16,013 19,127
2016 1st, West (17–8–9) Conference Semifinals Champions 14,094 14,878
2017 7th, West (11–10–13) did not qualify Quarterfinals Semifinals 15,122 did not qualify
2018 4th, West (16–9–9) Knockout Round Round of 16 Round of 16 15,512 10,297
2019 7th, West (13–12–9) First round Round of 16 did not qualify 14,842 N/A
2020 6th, West (9–6–7) Conference Semifinals not held did not qualify 5,527 N/A
2021 11th, West (7–15–12) did not qualify not held did not qualify 13,418 did not qualify

Year-by-year stats[change | change source]

Carlos Ruiz was FC Dallas's top scorer in 2005, 2006 and 2007
Season League record Top scorer
Played Won Lost Drew GF GA Points Name Goals
1996 32 17 15 NA 50 48 41 Jason Kreis 13
1997 32 16 16 NA 55 49 42 Dante Washington 12
1998 32 15 17 NA 43 59 37 Jason Kreis 9
1999 32 19 13 NA 54 35 51 Jason Kreis 18
2000 32 14 14 4 54 54 46 Ariel Graziani 15
2001 26 10 11 5 48 47 35 Ariel Graziani 11
2002 28 12 9 7 44 43 43 Jason Kreis 13
2003 30 6 19 5 35 64 23 Jason Kreis 7
2004 30 10 14 6 34 45 36 Eddie Johnson 12
2005 32 13 10 9 52 44 48 Carlos Ruiz 11
2006 32 16 12 4 48 44 52 Carlos Ruiz 13
2007 30 13 12 5 37 44 44 Carlos Ruiz 7
2008 30 8 10 12 45 41 36 Kenny Cooper 18
2009 30 11 13 6 50 47 39 Jeff Cunningham 17
2010 30 12 4 14 42 28 50 Jeff Cunningham 11
2011 34 15 11 7 42 39 52 Brek Shea 9
2012 34 9 13 12 42 47 39 Blas Pérez 9
2013 34 11 12 11 48 52 44 Blas Pérez 11
2014 34 16 12 6 55 45 54 Blas Pérez 11
2015 34 18 10 6 52 39 60 Fabián Castillo 10
2016 34 17 8 9 50 40 60 Maxi Urruti
Michael Barrios
9
2017 34 11 10 13 48 48 46 Maxi Urruti 12
2018 34 16 9 9 52 44 57 Maxi Urruti
Roland Lamah
8
2019 34 13 12 9 54 46 48 Jesús Ferreira 8
2020 22 9 6 7 28 24 34 Franco Jara 7
2021 34 7 15 12 47 56 33 Ricardo Pepi 13
Total 820 334 308 178 1209 1172 1150

Note: MLS did not allow ties prior to the 2000 season as games were decided by shootout when tied at full-time.

MLS Scoring Champion/Golden Boot[change | change source]

The following players have won the MLS Scoring Champion or the Golden Boot.

Player Season Points / goals
United States Jason Kreis 1999 51
United States Jeff Cunningham 2009 17

Top goalscorers[change | change source]

As of October 6, 2019[source?]
# Name Career MLS Playoffs Open Cup CCL Total
1 United States Jason Kreis 1996–2004 91 4 4 0 99
2 United States Kenny Cooper 2006–2009
2013
46 0 6 0 52
3 Panama Blas Pérez 2012–2015 36 1 5 0 42
Guatemala Carlos Ruiz 2005–2007
2016
32 5 3 2
5 Colombia Fabián Castillo 2011–2016 34 1 5 0 40
6 Argentina Ariel Graziani 1999
2000–2001
30 5 1 0 36
7 Argentina Maximiliano Urruti 2016–2018 29 1 3 2 35
Colombia Michael Barrios 2015–present 30 0 3 2
9 United States Jeff Cunningham 2008–2010 33 1 0 0 34
10 United States Dante Washington 1996–1999 24 4 3 2 33

International competition[change | change source]

Group stage v. Mexico Necaxa – 1–4
Group stage v. Mexico Cruz Azul – 1–2
Group stage v. Norway Odd Grenland – 1–2
Group stage v. Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv – 2–2
Semi-finals v. Norway Stabæk – 2–1
Fifth place match v. Norway Bodø/Glimt – 1–3
Group stage v. Mexico Guadalajara – 1–1
Group stage v. Mexico Pachuca – 1–1
Group stage v. United States Los Angeles Galaxy – 5–6
Preliminary Round v. El Salvador Alianza – 1–0
Preliminary Round v. El Salvador Alianza – 1–0
Group stage v. Mexico UNAM – 1–0
Group stage v. Canada Toronto FC – 1–0
Group stage v. Panama Tauro F.C. – 1–1
Group stage v. Mexico UNAM – 0–2
Group stage v. Panama Tauro F.C. – 3–5
Group stage v. Canada Toronto FC – 0–3
Group stage v. Nicaragua Real Estelí – 2–1
Group stage v. Nicaragua Real Estelí – 1–1
Group stage v. Guatemala Suchitepéquez – 0–0
Group stage v. Guatemala Suchitepéquez – 5–2
Quarter-finals v. Panama Árabe Unido – 4–0
Quarter-finals v. Panama Árabe Unido – 1–2
Semi-finals v. Mexico Pachuca – 2–1
Semi-finals v. Mexico Pachuca – 1–3
Round of 16 v. Panama Tauro F.C. – 0–1
Round of 16 v. Panama Tauro F.C. – 3–2

Stadium[change | change source]

Toyota Stadium, Dallas's home stadium since 2005
  • Cotton Bowl; Dallas, Texas (1996–2002, 2004–2005)
  • Dragon Stadium; Southlake, Texas (2003)
  • Toyota Stadium; Frisco, Texas (2005–present; known as Pizza Hut Park through the 2011 season and FC Dallas Stadium in the 2012 season and most of the 2013 season)

From 1996 to 2002 the team played in the 92,100-capacity Cotton Bowl in Dallas. To save money the club played its 2003 home games at Dragon Stadium, a high school stadium in Southlake, a Fort Worth suburb. The club lost money in the high school stadium because Texas law does not allow the sale of alcohol on a public high school campus. The team moved back to the Cotton Bowl for the 2004 season. In August 2005, the club moved into Pizza Hut Park, a soccer stadium in the northern suburb of Frisco. The contract that allowed Pizza Hut to put its name on the stadium ended in January 2012, and the stadium was renamed FC Dallas Stadium. In September 2013, a new sponsorship contract was signed with Toyota, and the stadium was renamed Toyota Stadium. Following renovations to the south end of Toyota Stadium, the relocated National Soccer Hall of Fame opened at the stadium in October 2018.

References[change | change source]

  1. "Roster". FCDallas.com. Retrieved June 29, 2022.

Other websites[change | change source]