Hafizullah Amin

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Hafizullah Amin
حفيظ الله امين
Hafizullah Amin.jpg
Amin, c. 1979
General Secretary of the Central Committee of the People's Democratic Party
In office
14 September 1979[1] – 27 December 1979
Preceded by Nur Muhammad Taraki
Succeeded by Babrak Karmal
Chairman of the Presidium of the Revolutionary Council
In office
14 September 1979 – 27 December 1979
Preceded by Nur Muhammad Taraki
Succeeded by Babrak Karmal
Minister of National Defence
In office
28 July 1979 – 27 December 1979
President Nur Muhammad Taraki
Himself
Preceded by Mohammad Aslam Watanjar
Succeeded by Mohammed Rafie
Chairman of the Council of Ministers
In office
27 March 1979 – 27 December 1979
President Nur Muhammad Taraki
Himself
Preceded by Nur Muhammad Taraki
Succeeded by Babrak Karmal
Minister of Foreign Affairs
In office
1 May 1978 – 28 July 1979
President Nur Muhammad Taraki
Preceded by Mohammed Daoud Khan
Succeeded by Shah Wali
Personal details
Born (1929-08-01)1 August 1929
Paghman, Afghanistan
Died 27 December 1979(1979-12-27) (aged 50)
Kabul, Afghanistan
Political party People's Democratic Party of Afghanistan(Khalq)
Spouse(s) Patmanah[2]
Children Abdur Rahman
one daughter.[3]
Profession Teacher, civil servant

Hafizullah Amin (Pashto: حفيظ الله امين‎, August 1, 1929December 27, 1979) was the second President of Afghanistan. He was president during the time of the communist Democratic Republic of Afghanistan. The Soviets got information from their KGB spies that Amin's rule was a threat to the stability of Afghanistan. They also were not certain about Amin’s loyalty to the Soviet Union. The Soviets found some information about Amin's trying to become closer to Pakistan and China. The Soviets also believed that Amin was behind the death of president Nur Muhammad Taraki. Finally, the Soviets decided to remove Amin.

References[change | change source]

  1. "Hafizullah Amin". Encyclopædia Britannica. 
  2. Misdaq 2006, p. 136.
  3. Afgantsy: The Russians in Afghanistan 1979–89, by Rodric Braithwaite, p104