James Gordon (comics)

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Commissioner James Gordon is a fictional Batman character who is the police commissioner of Gotham City and is a fellow ally of Batman who gives him all of his missions and criminals to capture or question. In some cases, Gordon doesn't know Batman's identity, in other cases he does. He was created by Bill Finger and Bob Kane as an ally of Batman. He first appeared in Detective Comics #27 (May 1939), Batman's first appearance, making him the first Batman supporting character ever to be introduced.[1]

Biography[change | change source]

As the police commissioner of Gotham City, Gordon shares Batman's deep commitment to stop the city of crime. The character is typically portrayed as having full trust in Batman and is even somewhat dependent on him. In many modern stories, he is somewhat skeptical of Batman's vigilante methods, but nevertheless believes that Gotham needs him.

Gordon was in the United States Marine Corps before becoming a police officer. He is the father of Barbara Gordon, who is secretly Batgirl.

Television[change | change source]

He was played by Lyle Talbot in Batman shows, Neil Hamilton in Batman, Bob Hastings made his voice in Batman: The Animated Series, Ray Wise in Batman: The Killing Joke and by Héctor Elizondo in The Lego Batman Movie. He was played by Ben McKenzie in Gotham.

Movies[change | change source]

Neil Hamilton was the first actor to play Gordon in a movie in the 1966 Batman movie
Pat Hingle played Gordon in the Burton/Schumacher movies (1989–1997)
Gary Oldman played the character in The Dark Knight Trilogy (2005–2012)
J. K. Simmons plays the character in the DC Extended Universe (since 2017)
Jeffrey Wright plays Gordon in The Batman (2022)
Ben McKenzie played the character in Gotham (2014–2019)

References[change | change source]

  1. Jimenez, Phil (2008). "Gordon, James W.". In Dougall, Alastair (ed.). The DC Comics Encyclopedia. New York: Dorling Kindersley. p. 141. ISBN 978-0-7566-4119-1. OCLC 213309017.