List of governors of Arizona

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Governor of Arizona
Arizona-StateSeal.svg
= Current Arizona Governor Doug Ducey
Incumbent
Doug Ducey

since January 5, 2015
StyleThe Honorable
ResidenceNo official residence
Term lengthFour years, can succeed self once; eligible again after 4-year respite
Inaugural holderGeorge W. P. Hunt
FormationFebruary 14, 1912
DeputyNone
Salary$95,000 (2013)[1]
Websitewww.azgovernor.gov

The Governor of Arizona is the head of the executive branch of Arizona's state government and the commander-in-chief of the state's military forces.

List of Governors[change | change source]

#[a]   Governor Term start Term end Party Terms[b]
1   George W. P. Hunt February 14, 1912 January 1, 1917 Democratic 2
2 Thomas Edward Campbell January 1, 1917 December 25, 1917 Republican 12[c]
1 George W. P. Hunt December 25, 1917 January 6, 1919 Democratic 12[c]
2 Thomas Edward Campbell January 6, 1919 January 1, 1923 Republican 2
1 George W. P. Hunt January 1, 1923 January 7, 1929 Democratic 3
3 John Calhoun Phillips January 7, 1929 January 5, 1931 Republican 1
1 George W. P. Hunt January 5, 1931 January 2, 1933 Democratic 1
4 Benjamin Baker Moeur January 2, 1933 January 4, 1937 Democratic 2
5 Rawghlie Clement Stanford January 4, 1937 January 2, 1939 Democratic 1
6 Robert Taylor Jones January 2, 1939 January 6, 1941 Democratic 1
7 Sidney Preston Osborn January 6, 1941 May 25, 1948 Democratic 3 12[d]
8 Dan Edward Garvey May 25, 1948 January 1, 1951 Democratic 1 12[e]
9 John Howard Pyle January 1, 1951 January 3, 1955 Republican 2
10 Ernest McFarland January 3, 1955 January 5, 1959 Democratic 2
11 Paul Fannin January 5, 1959 January 4, 1965 Republican 3
12 Samuel Pearson Goddard, Jr. January 4, 1965 January 2, 1967 Democratic 1
13 Jack Richard Williams January 2, 1967 January 6, 1975 Republican 3[f]
14 Raúl Héctor Castro January 6, 1975 October 20, 1977 Democratic 13[g]
15 Wesley Bolin October 20, 1977 March 4, 1978 Democratic 13[d][h]
16 Bruce Babbitt March 4, 1978 January 5, 1987 Democratic 2 13[i]
17 Evan Mecham January 5, 1987 April 4, 1988 Republican 12[j]
18 Rose Mofford April 4, 1988 March 6, 1991 Democratic 12[h]
19 Fife Symington March 6, 1991 September 5, 1997 Republican 1 12[k][l][m]
20 Jane Dee Hull September 5, 1997 January 6, 2003 Republican 1 12[e][m]
21 Janet Napolitano January 6, 2003 January 21, 2009 Democratic 1 12[n]
22 Jan Brewer January 21, 2009 January 5, 2015 Republican 1 12[e]
23 Doug Ducey January 5, 2015 Incumbent Republican 1[o]

Notes[change | change source]

  1. Repeat governors are officially numbered only once; subsequent terms are marked with their original number italicized.
  2. The fractional terms of some governors are not to be understood absolutely literally; rather, they are meant to show single terms during which multiple governors served, due to resignations, deaths and the like.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Thomas Edward Campbell's narrow election win was overturned by the Arizona Supreme Court on December 22, 1917, which, following a recount, awarded the office to George W.P. Hunt. Campbell vacated the office three days later.[2]
  4. 4.0 4.1 Died in office.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 As secretary of state, filled unexpired term, and was subsequently elected in their own right.
  6. The Constitution was amended in 1968 to increase gubernatorial terms from two to four years; Williams' first two terms were for two years, his third was for four years.
  7. Resigned to take post as U.S. Ambassador to Argentina.
  8. 8.0 8.1 As secretary of state, filled unexpired term.
  9. As state attorney general, filled unexpired term, and was subsequently elected in his own right; the secretary of state at the time had been appointed,[3] not elected, and therefore not in the line of succession according to the Arizona constitution.[4]
  10. Impeached and removed from office on charges of obstruction of justice and misuse of government funds.[5]
  11. Arizona adopted runoff voting after Evan Mecham won with only 43% of the vote. The 1990 election was very close, and a runoff was held on February 26, 1991, which Symington won, and he was inaugurated on March 6, 1991.[6]
  12. Resigned after being convicted of bank fraud, since state law does not allow felons to hold office; the conviction was later overturned and he was pardoned by President Bill Clinton.[7]
  13. 13.0 13.1 Fife Symington resigned on September 5, 1997; Jane Dee Hull did not take the oath of office until September 8, but she was governor for those three days regardless of the delay.[8]
  14. Resigned to become U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security.
  15. Governor Ducey's term expires on January 7, 2019.

References[change | change source]

  1. "CSG Releases 2013 Governor Salaries". The Council of State Governments. June 25, 2013. Retrieved November 23, 2014.
  2. "Arizona Governor Thomas Edward Campbell". National Governors Association. Retrieved October 13, 2008.[dead link]
  3. "Arizona Governor Rose Mofford". National Governors Association. Retrieved September 3, 2015.
  4. AZ Const. art 5, § 6
  5. "Arizona Governor Evan Mecham". National Governors Association. Retrieved October 13, 2008.[dead link]
  6. Mullaney, Marie Marmo (1994). Biographical Directory of the Governors of the United States, 1988–1994. Greenwood Publishing Group. pp. 29–30. ISBN 0-313-28312-5. Retrieved October 11, 2008.
  7. "Arizona Governor J. Fife Symington III". National Governors Association. Retrieved October 13, 2008.[dead link]
  8. Todd S., Purdum (1997-09-04). "Arizona Governor Convicted Of Fraud and Will Step Down". The New York Times. Retrieved October 11, 2008.