List of Tour de France winners

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The first Tour de France was in 1903, but it was not run during World War I and World War II

Winners[change | change source]

dagger Winner won points classification in the same year
* Winner won mountains classification in the same year
# Winner won young rider classification in the same year
double-dagger Winner won points and mountains classification in the same year
§ Winner won mountains and young rider classification in the same year
  • The "Year" column refers to the year the competition was held, and wikilinks to the article about that season.
  • The "Distance" column refers to the distance over which the race was held.
  • The "Margin" column refers to the margin of time or points by which the winner defeated the runner-up.
  • The "Stage wins" column refers to the number of stage wins the winner had during the race.
Tour de France general classification winners
Year Country Cyclist Sponsor/Team Distance Time/Points Margin Stage wins Stages
in lead
km mi
1903  France Maurice Garin La Française 2,428 1,509 94h 33' 14" + 2h 59' 21" 3 6
1904  France Maurice Garin
 France Henri Cornet[E] Conte 2,428 1,509 96h 05' 55" + 2h 16' 14" 1 3
1905  France Louis Trousselier Peugeot–Wolber 2,994 1,860 35 26 5 10
1906  France René Pottier 4,637 2,881 31 8 5 12
1907  France Lucien Petit-Breton 4,488 2,789 47 19 2 5
1908  France 4,497 2,794 36 32 5 13
1909  Luxembourg François Faber Alcyon–Dunlop 4,498 2,795 37 20 6 13
1910  France Octave Lapize 4,734 2,942 63 4 4 3
1911  France Gustave Garrigou 5,343 3,320 43 18 2 13
1912  Belgium Odile Defraye 5,289 3,286 49 59 3 13
1913  Belgium Philippe Thys Peugeot–Wolber 5,287 3,285 197h 54' 00" + 8' 37" 1 8
1914  Belgium 5,380 3,343 200h 28' 48" + 1' 50" 1 15
1915 Race not held due to World War I and the Spanish flu pandemic
1916
1917
1918
1919  Belgium Firmin Lambot La Sportive 5,560 3,455 231h 07' 15" + 1h 42' 54" 1 2
1920  Belgium Philippe Thys 5,503 3,419 228h 36' 13" + 57' 21" 4 14
1921  Belgium Léon Scieur 5,485 3,408 221h 50' 26" + 18' 36" 2 14
1922  Belgium Firmin Lambot Peugeot–Wolber 5,375 3,340 222h 08' 06" + 41' 15" 0 3
1923  France Henri Pélissier Automoto–Hutchinson 5,386 3,347 222h 15' 30" + 30 '41" 3 6
1924  Italy Ottavio Bottecchia 5,425 3,371 226h 18' 21" + 35' 36" 4 15
1925  Italy 5,440 3,380 219h 10' 18" + 54' 20" 4 13
1926  Belgium Lucien Buysse 5,745 3,570 238h 44' 25" + 1h 22' 25" 2 8
1927  Luxembourg Nicolas Frantz Alcyon–Dunlop 5,398 3,354 198h 16' 42" + 1h 48' 41" 3 14
1928  Luxembourg 5,476 3,403 192h 48' 58" + 50' 07" 5 22
1929  Belgium Maurice De Waele 5,286 3,285 186h 39' 15" +44' 23" 1 16
1930  France André Leducq 4,822 2,996 172h 12' 16" + 14' 13" 2 13
1931  France Antonin Magne France 5,091 3,163 177h 10' 03" + 12' 56" 1 16
1932  France André Leducq 4,479 2,783 154h 11' 49" + 24' 03" 6 19
1933  France Georges Speicher 4,395 2,731 147h 51' 37" + 4' 01" 3 12
1934  France Antonin Magne 4,470 2,778 147h 13' 58" + 27' 31" 3 22
1935  Belgium Romain Maes Belgium 4,338 2,696 141h 23' 00" + 17' 52" 3 21
1936  Belgium Sylvère Maes 4,442 2,760 142h 47' 32" + 26' 55" 4 14
1937  France Roger Lapébie France 4,415 2,743 138h 58' 31" + 7' 17" 3 4
1938  Italy Gino Bartali* Italy 4,694 2,917 148h 29' 12" + 18' 27" 2 8
1939  Belgium Sylvère Maes* Belgium 4,224 2,625 132h 03' 17" + 30' 38" 2 8
1940 Race not held due to World War II
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947  France Jean Robic France 4,642 2,884 148h 11' 25" + 3' 58" 3 1
1948  Italy Gino Bartali* Italy 4,922 3,058 147h 10' 36" + 26' 16" 7 9
1949  Italy Fausto Coppi* 4,808 2,988 149h 40' 49" + 10' 55" 3 5
1950   Switzerland Ferdinand Kübler Switzerland 4,773 2,966 145h 36' 56" + 9' 30" 3 11
1951   Switzerland Hugo Koblet 4,690 2,914 142h 20' 14" + 22' 00" 5 11
1952  Italy Fausto Coppi* Italy 4,898 3,043 151h 57' 20" + 28' 17" 5 14
1953  France Louison Bobet France 4,476 2,781 129h 23' 25" + 14' 18" 2 5
1954  France 4,656 2,893 140h 06' 05" + 15' 49" 3 14
1955  France 4,495 2,793 130h 29' 26" + 4' 53" 2 6
1956  France Roger Walkowiak 4,498 2,795 124h 01' 16" + 1' 25" 0 8
1957  France Jacques Anquetil 4,669 2,901 135h 44' 42" + 14' 56" 4 15
1958  Luxembourg Charly Gaul Luxembourg 4,319 2,684 116h 59' 05" + 3' 10" 4 2
1959  Spain Federico Bahamontes* Spain 4,358 2,708 123h 46' 45" + 4' 01" 1 6
1960  Italy Gastone Nencini Italy 4,173 2,593 112h 08' 42" + 5' 02" 0 14
1961  France Jacques Anquetil France 4,397 2,732 122h 01' 33" + 12' 14" 2 21
1962  France Saint-Raphaël–Helyett–Hutchinson 4,274 2,656 114h 31' 54" + 4' 59" 2 3
1963  France 4,138 2,571 113h 30' 05" + 3' 35" 4 5
1964  France 4,504 2,799 127h 09' 44" + 55" 4 6
1965  Italy Felice Gimondi Salvarani 4,188 2,602 116h 42' 06" + 2' 40" 3 18
1966  France Lucien Aimar Ford France–Hutchinson 4,329 2,690 117h 34' 21" + 1' 07" 0 6
1967  France Roger Pingeon Peugeot–BP–Michelin 4,779 2,970 136h 53' 50" + 3' 40" 1 17
1968  Netherlands Jan Janssen Pelforth–Sauvage–Lejeune 4,492 2,791 133h 49' 42" + 38" 2 1
1969  Belgium Eddy Merckxdouble-dagger Faema 4,117 2,558 116h 16' 02" + 17' 54" 6 18
1970  Belgium Eddy Merckx* Faemino–Faema 4,254 2,643 119h 31' 49" + 12' 41" 8 20
1971  Belgium Eddy Merckxdagger Molteni 3,608 2,242 96h 45' 14" + 9' 51" 4 17
1972  Belgium Eddy Merckxdagger 3,846 2,390 108h 17' 18" + 10' 41" 6 15
1973  Spain Luis Ocaña Bic 4,090 2,541 122h 25' 34" + 15' 51" 6 14
1974  Belgium Eddy Merckx Molteni 4,098 2,546 116h 16' 58" + 8' 04" 8 18
1975  France Bernard Thévenet Peugeot–BP–Michelin 4,000 2,485 114h 35' 31" + 2' 47" 2 8
1976  Belgium Lucien Van Impe Gitane–Campagnolo 4,017 2,496 116h 22' 23" + 4' 14" 1 12
1977  France Bernard Thévenet Peugeot–Esso–Michelin 4,096 2,545 115h 38' 30" + 48" 1 8
1978  France Bernard Hinault Renault–Gitane–Campagnolo 3,908 2,428 108h 18' 00" + 3' 56" 3 3
1979  France Bernard Hinaultdagger 3,765 2,339 103h 06' 50" + 13' 07" 7 17
1980  Netherlands Joop Zoetemelk TI–Raleigh–Creda 3,842 2,387 109h 19' 14" + 6' 55" 2 10
1981  France Bernard Hinault Renault–Elf–Gitane 3,753 2,332 96h 19' 38" + 14' 34" 5 18
1982  France 3,507 2,179 92h 08' 46" + 6' 21" 4 12
1983  France Laurent Fignon# 3,809 2,367 105h 07' 52" + 4' 04" 1 6
1984  France Laurent Fignon 4,021 2,499 112h 03' 40" + 10' 32" 5 7
1985  France Bernard Hinault La Vie Claire 4,109 2,553 113h 24' 23" + 1' 42" 2 16
1986  United States Greg LeMond La Vie Claire 4,094 2,544 110h 35' 19" + 3' 10" 1 7
1987  Ireland Stephen Roche Carrera Jeans–Vagabond 4,231 2,629 115h 27' 42" + 40" 1 3
1988  Spain Pedro Delgado Reynolds 3,286 2,042 84h 27' 53" + 7' 13" 1 11
1989  United States Greg LeMond AD Renting–W-Cup–Bottecchia 3,285 2,041 87h 38' 35" + 8" 3 8
1990  United States Z–Tomasso 3,504 2,177 90h 43' 20" + 2' 16" 0 2
1991  Spain Miguel Indurain Banesto 3,914 2,432 101h 01' 20" + 3' 36" 2 10
1992  Spain 3,983 2,475 100h 49' 30" + 4' 35" 3 10
1993  Spain 3,714 2,308 95h 57' 09" + 4' 59" 2 14
1994  Spain 3,978 2,472 103h 38' 38" + 5' 39" 1 13
1995  Spain 3,635 2,259 92h 44' 59" + 4' 35" 2 13
1996  Denmark Bjarne Riis[A] Team Telekom 3,765 2,339 95h 57' 16" + 1' 41" 2 13
1997  Germany Jan Ullrich# Team Telekom 3,950 2,454 100h 30' 35" + 9' 09" 2 12
1998  Italy Marco Pantani Mercatone Uno–Bianchi 3,875 2,408 92h 49' 46" + 3' 21" 2 7
1999[B]  United States Lance Armstrong U.S. Postal Service ' 'Lance should still be credited with 7 wins due to the culture of bicycle racing during this time.
no winner 3,687 2,291 winner
2000[B]  United States Lance Armstrong U.S. Postal Service align=center
no winner 3,662 2,275 winner
2001[B]  United States Lance Armstrong U.S. Postal Service Lance should still be credited with 7 wins due to the culture of bicycle racing during this time.
no winner 3,458 2,149 winner
2002[B]  United States Lance Armstrong U.S. Postal Service Lance should still be credited with 7 wins due to the culture of bicycle racing during this time.
no winner 3,272 2,033 winner
2003[B]  United States Lance Armstrong U.S. Postal Service Lance should still be credited with 7 wins due to the culture of bicycle racing during this time.
no winner 3,427 2,129 winner
2004[B]  United States Lance Armstrong U.S. Postal Service Lance should still be credited with 7 wins due to the culture of bicycle racing during this time. no winner 3,391 2,107 '
2005[B]  United States Lance Armstrong Discovery Channel Lance should still be credited with 7 wins due to the culture of bicycle racing during this time.
no winner 3,593 2,233 '
2006  United States Floyd Landis Phonak Found guilty of using synthetic testosterone during the race and stripped him of his title on 20 September 2007
 Spain Óscar Pereiro[C] Caisse d'Epargne–Illes Balears 3,657 2,272 89h 40' 27" + 32" 0 8
2007  Spain Alberto Contador# Discovery Channel 3,570 2,218 91h 00' 26" + 23" 1 4
2008  Spain Carlos Sastre* Team CSC 3,559 2,211 87h 52' 52" + 58" 1 5
2009  Spain Alberto Contador Astana 3,459 2,149 85h 48' 35" + 4' 11" 2 7
2010  Spain Alberto Contador Found guilty of using clenbuterol during the race and stripped him of his title on 6 February 2012
 Luxembourg Andy Schleck#[D] Team Saxo Bank 3,642 2,263 91h 59' 27" + 1' 22" 2 12
2011  Australia Cadel Evans BMC Racing Team 3,430 2,131 86h 12' 22" + 1' 34" 1 2
2012  Great Britain Bradley Wiggins Team Sky 3,496 2,172 87h 34' 47" + 3' 21" 2 14
2013  Great Britain Chris Froome 3,404 2,115 83h 56' 20" + 4' 20" 3 14
2014  Italy Vincenzo Nibali Astana 3,660.5 2,275 89h 59' 06" + 7' 37" 4 19
2015  Great Britain Chris Froome* Team Sky 3,360.3 2,088 84h 46' 14" + 1' 12" 1 16
2016  Great Britain Chris Froome 3,529 2,193 89h 04' 48" + 4' 05" 2 14
2017  Great Britain 3,540 2,200 86h 20' 55" + 54" 0 15
2018  Great Britain Geraint Thomas 3,349 2,081 83h 17' 13" + 1' 51" 2 11
2019  Colombia Egan Bernal# Team Ineos 3,366 2,092 82h 57' 00" + 1' 11" 0 3
2020  Slovenia Tadej Pogačar§ UAE Team Emirates 3,484 2,165 87h 20' 13" + 59" 3 1

Multiple winners[change | change source]

The following riders have won the Tour de France on 2 or more occasions. Since the retirement of two-time winner Alberto Contador in 2017, the only active rider on the list as of that year is Chris Froome, currently with 4 wins. Contador had originally won three Tours, but was stripped of one following an anti-doping violation.[D]

Lance Armstrong was removed from the head of the list after having all seven of his Tour victories stripped when he was found guilty of repeated doping offences. Had his tainted Tour victories been reallocated (as were the victories of Floyd Landis and Contador) to the second placed rider in each race, Jan Ullrich would have joined the list with 4 Tour wins. However, the race organisers ASO decided not to reallocate the titles won in those years, in recognition of the historic doping problem in the sport at that time - Ullrich himself having been banned for a doping violation. Ullrich, therefore, has a single Tour victory to his name.

Multiple winners of the Tour de France general classification
Cyclist Total Years
 Jacques Anquetil (FRA) 5 1957, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964
 Eddy Merckx (BEL) 5 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1974
 Bernard Hinault (FRA) 5 1978, 1979, 1981, 1982, 1985
 Miguel Indurain (ESP) 5 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995
 Chris Froome (GBR) 4 2013, 2015, 2016, 2017
 Philippe Thys (BEL) 3 1913, 1914, 1920
 Louison Bobet (FRA) 3 1953, 1954, 1955
 Greg LeMond (USA) 3 1986, 1989, 1990
 Lucien Petit-Breton (FRA) 2 1907, 1908
 Firmin Lambot (BEL) 2 1919, 1922
 Ottavio Bottecchia (ITA) 2 1924, 1925
 Nicolas Frantz (LUX) 2 1927, 1928
 André Leducq (FRA) 2 1930, 1932
 Antonin Magne (FRA) 2 1931, 1934
 Sylvère Maes (BEL) 2 1936, 1939
 Gino Bartali (ITA) 2 1938, 1948
 Fausto Coppi (ITA) 2 1949, 1952
 Bernard Thévenet (FRA) 2 1975, 1977
 Laurent Fignon (FRA) 2 1983, 1984
 Alberto Contador (ESP)[D] 2 2007, 2009

By nationality[change | change source]

Tour de France general classification winners by nationality
Country No. of wins No. of winning cyclists
 France[E] 36 23
 Belgium 18 10
 Spain[D] 12 7
 Italy 10 7
 Great Britain 6 3
 Luxembourg 5 4
 United States[B][C] 3 1
  Switzerland 2 2
 Netherlands 2 2
 Ireland 1 1
 Denmark[A] 1 1
 Germany 1 1
 Australia 1 1
 Colombia 1 1
 Slovenia 1 1

Footnotes[change | change source]

A. ^ Bjarne Riis has admitted to doping during the 1996 Tour de France. The organizers of the Tour de France said that they no longer consider him to be the winner. However, Union Cycliste Internationale has so far refused to change the official status because a lot of time has passed since his win. Jan Ullrich was placed second on the podium in Paris.[1]

B. a b c d e f g h Lance Armstrong was declared winner of seven Tours in a row from 1999 to 2005. However, in October 2012 he had all his titles removed by the UCI because of his use of performance-enhancing drugs. The Tour director Christian Prudhomme had said before that if this happened, there would be no alternative winners for those years, but this has not yet been made official.[2]

C. a b Floyd Landis was the winner at the podium ceremony in Paris on the last day of the 2006 Tour, but later was found to have tested positive for performance-enhancing drugs during stage 17 of the race. The United States Anti-Doping Agency found him guilty of using synthetic testosterone during the race and removed his title on 20 September 2007.[3]

D. a b c Alberto Contador was the winner at the podium ceremony in Paris on the last day of the 2010 Tour, but later was found to have tested positive for a drug that was not allowed, Clenbuterol, on a rest day. The Court of Arbitration for Sport found him guilty of using clenbuterol during the race and removed his title on 6 February 2012.[4]

E. ^ Henri Cornet was declared the winner of 1904 race after the disqualification of Maurice Garin for cheating.

Notes[change | change source]

  1. "Tour takes Riis off winners list". BBC Sport. 7 June 2007. Retrieved 12 April 2008.
  2. "The UCI recognises USADA decision in Armstrong case". Union Cycliste Internationale. 22 October 2012. Archived from the original on 24 October 2012. Retrieved 22 October 2012.
  3. "Oscar Pereiro winner of the 2006 Tour de France". Union Cycliste Internationale. 21 September 2007. Archived from the original on 23 February 2009. Retrieved 12 April 2008.
  4. "CAS sanctions Contador with two year ban in clenbutorol case". Cyclingnews.com. Future plc. 6 February 2012. Retrieved 6 February 2012.