Mazda

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A Mazda Rx-7 on display in the Mazda museum

Mazda Motor Corporation is a car manufacturer or maker based in Hiroshima, Japan. Mazda is the 15th largest car maker in the world,[1] and 12th largest in U.S. sales.[2] The company was started in 1920. Today it has about 44,000 employees.[3] Sales are 2,057,614,000,000 yen.

History[change | change source]

In 1920,Toyo Koruku Kogyo was established. In 1984, it changed its name to Mazda Motor Corporation. The company is unique in using rotary engines in some of its cars. A rotary engine has more power for its weight than ordinary engines. In 1991, the Mazda 787B (which had a rotary engine) won the 24 Heures du Mans. From 1979 to 2010, Mazda had a partnership with Ford Motor Company. At one point, Ford owned 1/3 of Mazda's stock. Since 2000, Mazda has grown, especially in Europe and North America, and it is now completely separate from Ford. In 2015, Mazda and Toyota agreed to work together.[4]

Brand[change | change source]

Mazda produces cars only in Japan and Mexico, but 80% of its sales are outside of Japan. Mazda is the only company that produces cars which have rotary engines (but most of its cars do not have rotary engines). The cars are popular in Australia and Europe, especially Germany and U.K.[source?] Nowadays, Mazda's slogan is ZOOM-ZOOM. It is famous for the movie Only Strong. ZOOM-ZOOM comes from English-speaking children calling cars ZOOM-ZOOM. [5]

Name[change | change source]

Mazda's company name is derived from Matsuda Jujirou who was the founder of this company, and the Zoroastrian god, Ahura Mazda. Ahura Mazda is a symbol of wisdom, reason, and harmony.

References[change | change source]

  1. "Global Car Sales 2016 Q1" (PDF). JATO. Retrieved 27 October 2016. 
  2. "Auto Sales - Markets Data". Wall Street Journal. Retrieved 27 October 2016. 
  3. "About Mazda". Mazda. Retrieved 27 October 2016. 
  4. "Mazda and Toyota form partnership". AutoNews. Retrieved 11 December 2016. 
  5. "fashionsnap.com". Retrieved 2 February 2015. 

Other websites[change | change source]