Norio Sasaki

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Norio Sasaki
Norio Sasaki.jpg
Personal information
Date of birth (1958-05-24) 24 May 1958 (age 61)
Place of birth Yamagata Prefecture, Japan
Club information
Current team
Japan Women
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1989–1990 NTT Kanto 26 (2)
Teams managed
1997–1998 Omiya Ardija
2006–2007 Japan Women U20
2008–present Japan Women
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 14 July 2011
‡ National team caps and goals correct as of 14 July 2011
In this Japanese name, the family name is Sasaki.

Norio Sasaki (佐々木 則夫, Sasaki Norio, born 24 May 1958) is a Japanese sportsman. He is best known as an association football player and coach.[1]

Sasaki was the head coach of the Japan women's national football team when they won the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup. FIFA[2] named Sasaki 2011 "Coach of the Year".[1] He also coached the national team to a second-place finish at the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup.

He was also coach of the women's team which won a silver medal in the 2012 Summer Olympics at London.[3]

Sasaki announced his retirement from coaching in 2012,[4] but was persuaded to stay on as national team coach.

Honours[change | change source]

  • FIFA World Coach of the Year, 2011[5]

Related pages[change | change source]

References[change | change source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 FIFA.com, FIFA Ballon d'Or: Norio Sasaki; retrieved 2012-10-12.
  2. FIFA is an acronym. FIFA stands for Fédération Internationale de Football Association, which is the commonly used French name of the International Federation of Association Football.
  3. Baxter, Kevin. "Japanese soccer team gets upgrade ...," Los Angeles Times. August 11, 2012; retrieved 2012-8-17.
  4. Westlake, Adam. "Nadeshiko Japan coach Sasaki to step down after London Olympics," Japan Daily Press. August 9, 2012; retrieved 2012-8-17.
  5. Meiji University, "Norio Sasaki, coach of Nadeshiko Japan and a graduate of Meiji University, receives the FIFA Women’s Football Coach of the Year prize, the first-ever such feat for an Asian national," January 11, 2012; retrieved 2012-8-17.

Other websites[change | change source]