Old French

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Old French
Franceis, François, Romanz
Pronunciation [fɾãntsejs], [fɾãntsɔjs], [romãnts]
Region northern France, parts of Belgium (Wallonia), England, Ireland, Kingdom of Sicily, Principality of Antioch, Kingdom of Cyprus
Era evolved into Middle French by the 14th century
Language codes
ISO 639-2 fro
ISO 639-3 fro
Glottolog oldf1239[1]
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Old French was the Romance dialect continuum spoken in the northern half of modern France and parts of modern Belgium and Switzerland from around 1000 to 1300. It was then known as the langue d'oïl. This was different from the langue d'oc (Occitan language, also then called Provençal), whose territory bordered that of Old French to the south.

The Old Frankish language added many words to Old French after the conquest by the tribe of the Franks, of the portions of Roman Gaul that are now France and Belgium, during the Migration Period.

References[change | change source]

  1. Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Old French". Glottolog 3.0. Jena, Germany: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History.