User talk:Nxavar

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Welcome[change source]

Hello, Nxavar, and welcome to the Simple English Wikipedia! Thank you for your changes.

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Good luck and happy changing! Mr Wiki Pro (talk) 15:00, 1 January 2014 (UTC)

Elementary particle[change source]

Although I'm definitely not an expert on physics, the following statement in the intro of elementary particle seems odd: "An elementary particle can be a boson or a fermion, depending on the way it moves in space". I can't find a similar statement in the En wiki article, and I wonder if it's just a misguided attempt to be "simple". Being accurate, or at least as far as we can, is primary for an encyclopedia. No simplification should lead us to say something which is outright wrong. Macdonald-ross (talk) 15:02, 2 June 2014 (UTC)

"The way it moves": fermions obey the en:Fermi-Dirac statistics, while bosons obey the en:Einstein-Bose statistics. These statistics have a lot to do with motion. For example, this categorization determines whether the particles collide (en:Pauli exclusion principle) and whether their en:spin, a measure of momentum and by extent a property of motion, is a whole number or not. We can include the above along with the vague statement "the way it moves in space", as explanatory text. What is your opinion? Nxavar (talk) 22:52, 2 June 2014 (UTC)
I changed the problematic phrase with what the enwiki article on elementary particles says in its lead section. Thanks for the feedback! Nxavar (talk) 06:47, 3 June 2014 (UTC)